Tag Archives: mint

Recipe of the Week: Spring Chicken in Broth

Spring Chicken in Broth with Minted Pea Purée

Spring Chicken in Broth with Minted Pea Puree

This delicious dish is ‘spring in a bowl’.

The show-stopping flavours will make you want to cook it again and again – it really is top-notch restaurant quality.

Enjoy this recipe for two.

RECIPE

 

Just for One or Two cookbookRecipe taken from Just for One or Two cookbook

Inspiration for easy, delicious meals – the ideal cookbook for singles, couples, students and parents. The Just For One Or Two cookbook shows you how to cook delicious meals for one or two people with little effort and minimal waste.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Categories:

RELATED POSTS

 

Competition! Win a Gourmet Gadgetry Chocolate Fountain plus Chocolate Mint Biscuit Bars Recipe

Win a Chocolate Fountain

Win a Gourmet Gadgetry Chocolate Fountain

Dairy Diary and Lakeland are offering you the chance to win the chocoholic’s ultimate dream – just imagine liquid chocolate gently cascading down the tiers of this fountain of sheer indulgence.

Certain to be a real show-stopper at any party.

ENTER

 


Deliciously retro, these biscuit bars will go down a storm.

Taken from the fabulous 2017 Dairy Diary, which is on sale now! Click here.

 

Chocolate Mint Biscuit Bars

Chocolate Mint Biscuit Bars

  • Servings: Makes 10
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Calories 321 per portion
Fat 14g (8.7g sat) per portion
Suitable for vegetarians
Suitable for freezing

Ingredients

  • Butter 110g (4oz), softened
  • Caster sugar 110g (4oz)
  • Plain flour 175g (6oz)
  • Icing sugar 175g (6oz)
  • Peppermint extract ½ tspDark chocolate 175g (6oz), chopped

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 180°C/160°fan/Gas 4 and grease a tin or dish 25cm x 17cm (10in x 7in). Cream butter and caster sugar together until pale and fluffy. Mix in flour and knead to a smooth dough. Press into tin, prick all over with a fork then bake for 15 minutes. Leave to cool in tin.
  2. In a bowl, mix icing sugar with 1-2 tbsp water and peppermint extract then spread over shortbread base. Leave to set.
  3. Melt chocolate in a bowl set over a pan of barely simmering water. Spread over icing and leave in tin to cool. When set, cut into bars.

This recipe is taken from the 2017 Dairy Diary. To find out more click here.

 


 

#chocolateweek
#win
#competition
#recipeoftheweek
#chocolateweek
#chocolaterecipes
#yum

It’s Chocolate Week!!

River of Chocolate Willy Wonka

Enjoy these AMAZING recipes

As this week is Chocolate Week I couldn’t resist sharing two of our most delectable chocolate recipes with you.

But first, a few choccie facts!

  • The Famous Chocolate River in the original Charlie & the Chocolate Factory film was made from 15,000 gallons of water mixed with chocolate and cream.
  • We’re a continent of chocolate lovers – Europeans eat almost half of the world’s chocolate.
  • In celebration of its 100th birthday, Thornton’s created the world’s largest chocolate bar – weighing a record breaking 5,792.50kg.
  • So many Toblerone bars are sold each year that, if they were to be laid end to end, they would go on for 62,000km which is longer than the circumference of the Earth.

Facts courtesy of The Telegraph .

Now, time for chocolate!!

 


Chocolate Mint Biscuit Bars

Chocolate Mint Biscuit Bars

  • Servings: Makes 10
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Calories 321 per portion
Fat 14g (8.7g sat) per portion
Suitable for vegetarians
Suitable for freezing

Ingredients

  • Butter 110g (4oz), softened
  • Caster sugar 110g (4oz)
  • Plain flour 175g (6oz)
  • Icing sugar 175g (6oz)
  • Peppermint extract ½ tsp

    Dark chocolate 175g (6oz), chopped

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 180°C/160°fan/Gas 4 and grease a tin or dish 25cm x 17cm (10in x 7in). Cream butter and caster sugar together until pale and fluffy. Mix in flour and knead to a smooth dough. Press into tin, prick all over with a fork then bake for 15 minutes. Leave to cool in tin.
  2. In a bowl, mix icing sugar with 1-2 tbsp water and peppermint extract then spread over shortbread base. Leave to set.
  3. Melt chocolate in a bowl set over a pan of barely simmering water. Spread over icing and leave in tin to cool. When set, cut into bars.

This recipe is taken from the 2017 Dairy Diary. To find out more click here.

 


Chocolate Pear Flan

Chocolate Pear Flan

  • Servings: 6
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Calories 555 per portion
Fat 40g (26g sat) per portion
Suitable for vegetarians
Suitable for freezing

Ingredients

  • Plain flour 110g (4oz)
  • Drinking chocolate 25g (1oz)
  • Butter 110g (4oz)
  • Desiccated coconut 65g (2½oz)
  • Caster sugar 75g (3oz)
  • Dark chocolate 75g (3oz), chopped, plus extra grated to decorate
  • Egg yolk 1
  • Milk 150ml (¼ pint)
  • Double cream 150ml (½ pint)
  • Pear halves 410g can, drained

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 170°C/150°fan/Gas 3.
  2. Sift 90g (3½oz) of the flour and the drinking chocolate into a bowl. Rub in the butter and stir in the coconut and 50g (2oz) of the sugar then press together gently to form a dough. Press the dough into the base and sides of a 20cm (8in) flan tin. Prick the base and bake for 30 minutes. Cool.
  3. Melt the chocolate in a heatproof bowl set over a pan of barely simmering water.
  4. In a pan, off the heat, beat the egg yolk and the remaining sugar together until thick. Stir in the remaining flour and the milk. Heat, stirring, until the mixture boils and thickens. Simmer for 3 minutes then remove from the heat and stir in the melted chocolate. Cool.
  5. Remove the pastry case from the tin and spread the cold chocolate cream over the pastry. Whip the cream until soft peaks form and then spoon onto the chocolate. Arrange the pear halves on the cream and sprinkle with grated chocolate.

Cook’s tip

The shortbread base and chocolate filling can be prepped in advance but don’t add the whipped cream and pears until just as you are about to serve.

This recipe is taken from Dairy Diary Favourites cookbook. To find out more click here.


 

#chocolateweek

#chocolaterecipes

#yum

How to grow kitchen herbs

How to grow your own kitchen herbs

.

How to grow your own herbs for the kitchen

Whilst doing all the testing for our next cookbook, I have come to realise just how expensive fresh herbs can be. They don’t last long in the fridge either and often go to waste if I forget to freeze any leftovers.

So, this year I am
determined to grow
my own.

It will be wonderful to step out of the kitchen door to the subtle scent of sage, mint and rosemary, and be able to clip a few leaves off to add to salads, soups and stews.

Here are some tips on how to sow your own seeds. Something I haven’t done for a long while!

 

 

Grow kitchen herbs

Grow kitchen herbs

Pot Herbs for the Kitchen

Fresh herbs give a great lift to many foods – so grow your own in pots sited near the kitchen for ease of picking. And why not choose some colourful, fun containers to plant in?

Sow seeds in March, or buy small herb plants in April or May, pot up at once and start picking leaves as soon as the plants have grown slightly. A sunny position is best. The job will take about an hour.

What you need

Plants Seed packets or small plants of parsley, thyme, marjoram (oregano), sage, mint and rosemary.

Equipment Six small plastic pots for potting up seedlings bought at the garden centre. Seed tray, modular cell system or jiffy pots for sowing seeds, if using. Five containers such as the enamel kettles. Soil-based potting compost and proprietary seed compost if using. Broken crocks for drainage. Trowel.

Instructions

1 Fill the seed tray or modular cell system with seed compost and sow your seeds according to the instructions on the packets, or sow in jiffy pots according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Keep on a kitchen windowsill while the seeds germinate, then move them outside when all danger of frost is past.

2 When the seedlings are large enough to handle, pot them on into the plastic pots using potting compost and lining with broken crocks for drainage.

3 Or, line the plastic pots with broken crocks and fill with potting compost, into which you have mixed some sharp sand (if using). Then plant your garden centre seedlings, place into the containers and set out in an attractive arrangement. In general, allow one herb per container, but if the container is big enough, put several in together – here rosemary, parsley and mint have been put in the central container.

4 Place the young herb plants outside only when all danger of frost is past. If you’re uncertain, place them outside on sunny days and bring them in at night until the weather warms up enough for them to be left outside permanently.

5 Pick and use the leaves regularly. All these herbs can grow quite large and, by the end of summer, may well have outgrown their containers unless you keep them under control.

Notes Most herbs do best in full sun. They don’t require rich soil, but they must not be allowed to get waterlogged, so good drainage is essential. Rosemary, sage, thyme and marjoram are tough, shrubby plants and can be kept going for years if put into the ground or grown in large enough pots. Mint and parsley are herbaceous and will die down in winter, but reappear again in spring.

Aftercare Regular picking is needed, and watering with care.

.
Seasonal Garden IdeasThis project is taken from
Seasonal Garden Ideas 

a collection of lovely, easy
projects for any garden.

Now available online
for just £3.99  

PLUS FREE P&P!
(Feb/March 2013 orders).

 

 

Herbs for the Garden

Fresh herbs give a great lift to many foods – so grow your own in pots sited near the kitchen for ease of picking. And why not choose some colourful, fun containers to plant in?

Sow seeds in March, or buy small herb plants in April or May, pot up at once and start picking leaves as soon as the plants have grown slightly. Plant in a sunny position. The job will take about an hour.

Plants required
Seed packets or small plants of parsley, thyme, marjoram (oregano), sage, mint and rosemary.

Equipment required
Six small plastic pots for potting up seedlings bought at the garden centre.
Seed tray, modular cell system or jiffy pots for sowing seeds, if using.
Five containers such as the enamel kettles.
Soil-based potting compost and proprietary seed compost if using.
Broken crocks for drainage.
Trowel.

1 Fill the seed tray or modular cell system with seed compost and sow your seeds according to the instructions on the packets, or sow in jiffy pots according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Keep on a kitchen windowsill while the seeds germinate, then move them outside when all danger of frost is past.

2 When the seedlings are large enough to handle, pot them on into the plastic pots using potting compost and lining with broken crocks for drainage.

3 Or, line the plastic pots with broken crocks and fill with potting compost, into which you have mixed some sharp sand (if using). Then plant your garden centre seedlings, place into the containers and set out in an attractive arrangement. In general, allow one herb per container, but if the container is big enough, put several in together – here rosemary, parsley and mint have been put in the central container.

4 Place the young herb plants outside only when all danger of frost is past. If you’re uncertain, place them outside on sunny days and bring them in at night until the weather warms up enough for them to be left outside permanently.

5 Pick and use the leaves regularly. All these herbs can grow quite large and, by the end of summer, may well have outgrown their containers unless you keep them under control.

Notes
Most herbs do best in full sun. They don’t require rich soil, but they must not be allowed to get waterlogged, so good drainage is essential. Rosemary, sage, thyme and marjoram are tough, shrubby plants and can be kept going for years if put into the ground or grown in large enough pots. Mint and parsley are herbaceous and will die down in winter, but reappear again in spring.

Aftercare
Regular picking is needed, and watering with care.

Project taken from Seasonal Garden Ideas

Follow us on Twitter! Follow us on Twitter
Follow us on Facebook! Become a fan

%d bloggers like this: