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Recipe of the Week: Fish with Oregano Butter and Cauliflower Purée

Delicately flavoured pan-fried hake on a bed of creamy crushed cauliflower.

Fish with Oregano Butter and Cauliflower Purée

Fish with Oregano Butter & Cauliflower Purée

  • Servings: 2
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Calories 688 per portion
Fat 51g (28g sat) per portion

Ingredients

  • Green beans 175g (6oz), trimmed
  • Cauliflower half a head, broken into florets
  • Double cream 4 tbsp
  • Freshly grated nutmeg
  • Hake (or cod) fillet, skin on
  • 4 x 110g (4oz)
  • Olive oil, for brushing
  • Butter 25g (1oz)
  • Oregano leaves 2 tbsp plus extra for garnish
  • White wine vinegar 1-2 tsp

Instructions

  1. Half fill a steamer base with water and bring to the boil. Add beans to the water and cauliflower to steamer basket. Cover and cook for 5 minutes. Drain and keep beans warm
  2. Add cream to steamer base with cauliflower, nutmeg and seasoning. Bring to the boil and roughly crush with a fork.
  3. Put a non-stick frying pan on a high heat. Brush fish with oil and cook, skin-side down for 4 minutes. Turn and cook for about 2 minutes more until cooked through. Keep warm.
  4. Add butter and oregano to pan and let it brown. Remove from heat and add vinegar.
  5. Pour butter over fish and serve on cauliflower with beans. Garnish with oregano leaves.

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Recipe taken from Dairy Diary 2018

 

 

 

 

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Recipe of the Week: Fragrant Turkey with Chickpeas

 

It’s super-healthy and absolutely delicious!

This turkey recipe is so packed with flavour that you won’t even notice that it’s only 353 calories per portion.

I’ve made it three times already this year. And it really is worth the wait!

 

Fragrant Turkey with Chickpeas

 

Fragrant Turkey with Chickpeas

  • Servings: 4
  • Print

Calories 353 per portion
Fat 12g (3g sat) per portion
Suitable for freezing

Ingredients

  • Turkey drumstick approx. 700g (1lb 9oz)
  • Sunflower oil 1 tbsp
  • Onion 1, peeled and chopped
  • Garlic 2 cloves, peeled and finely chopped
  • Root ginger 4cm (1½in) piece, peeled and finely chopped
  • Ground cumin 1 tsp
  • Ground turmeric 1 tsp
  • Mixed spice 1 tsp
  • Dried crushed chillies ½–1 tsp
  • Chopped tomatoes 400g can
  • Chickpeas 400g can, drained
  • Chicken stock 600ml (1 pint)
  • Raisins or sultanas 50g (2oz)
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • Carrots 350g (12oz), diced
  • Curly kale 110g (4oz), sliced
  • Rice or couscous to serve (optional)

Instructions

  1. Partially sever the knuckle end of the turkey drumstick by using a large knife and hitting it with a rolling pin or hammer so that the knuckle can be bent round and will fit in a large saucepan. Heat the oil in the pan and brown the turkey for about 5 minutes, turning once or twice. When the drumstick has begun to colour, add the onion and cook for a further 5 minutes.

  2. Add the garlic, ginger, ground spices and chillies and cook for 1 minute more, then mix in the tomatoes, chickpeas, stock and dried fruit. Season with pepper and bring to the boil, stirring the sauce to mix.

  3. Reduce the heat, cover and simmer for 2 hours or until the turkey is almost falling off the bone. Lift the drumstick out of the pan and put onto a plate. Add the carrots to the pan and cook uncovered for 15 minutes until just tender.

  4. Meanwhile, remove the skin, tendons and bone from the turkey, then cut the meat into pieces and return to the pan.

  5. Add the kale and cook for a few minutes until just wilted. Spoon the stew into warmed shallow bowls lined with couscous or rice, if using.

    Slow cooker method

    Follow the method to step 3 and then transfer to the slow cooker. Add the carrots, cover and cook on high for 6-7 hours. Add the kale for the last 15 minutes.

    Cook’s tips

    The ingredients list may look long but the jars of spices keep for ages and root ginger can be chopped and frozen or kept in the salad compartment of the fridge for several weeks.

    If you have runner beans, slice and add with the carrots and cook for about 10 minutes until just tender.

Recipe taken from Cook it Slowly!

 

Cook it Slowly! is now back in stock!

Prepare quickly, cook slowly and savour every mouthful.

Cook it Slowly! cookbookSlowly-cooked meals are easy, fuss-free and delicious with melt-in-the-mouth textures and intense flavours.

Just 20 minutes or so is all it takes to prepare the majority of the recipes, then you can leave them to cook slowly. Every recipe can be cooked either on the hob or in the oven and also, where appropriate, in a slow cooker.

Order your copy of the sell-out cookbook now.

Buy

 

 

#slowcook

#tripletested

#healthyeating

#foodtrends

THE cookbook of the year!

Cook it Slowly! cookbook

 

Cook it Slowly! is now back in stock!

Prepare quickly, cook slowly and savour every mouthful.

Cook it Slowly! cookbookSlowly-cooked meals are easy, fuss-free and delicious with melt-in-the-mouth textures and intense flavours.

Just 20 minutes or so is all it takes to prepare the majority of the recipes, then you can leave them to cook slowly. Every recipe can be cooked either on the hob or in the oven and also, where appropriate, in a slow cooker.

Order your copy of the sell-out cookbook now.

Buy

 

Would you like to try before you buy?

This turkey recipe is so packed with flavour that you won’t even notice that it’s only 353 calories per portion – perfect for post-Christmas indulgence.

I’ve made it three times already this year. And it really is worth the wait!

 

Fragrant Turkey with Chickpeas

 

Fragrant Turkey with Chickpeas

Serves 4
Preparation 25 minutes
Cooking 2½ hours or 6-7 hours in a slow cooker)
Per portion: 353 Kcal, 12g fat (3g saturated)

Go to recipe…

GO TO RECIPE

 

 

 

 

 

#slowcook

#tripletested

#healthyeating

#foodtrends

Recipe of the Week: Chocolate Ice Cream with Salted Caramel

Chocolate Ice Cream with Salted Caramel Sauce

 

This gorgeous dessert makes a fab alternative to Christmas Pudding on the ‘big day’.

Chocolate Ice Cream with Salted Caramel Sauce

  • Servings: 8
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Calories 460 per portion
Fat 29g (17g sat) per portion
Suitable for vegetarians
Suitable for freezing

Ingredients

  • Whole milk 300ml (½ pint)
  • Dark chocolate 100g bar, broken up
  • Egg yolks 3 large
  • Caster sugar 325g (11½oz)
  • Whipping cream 300ml pot
  • Double cream 150ml pot
  • Sea salt 1 tsp

Instructions

  1. Heat milk in a pan, add chocolate and stir until smooth.
  2. In a bowl, whisk egg yolks with 75g (3oz) sugar until thick. Stir in chocolate milk then pour back into pan and cook over gentle heat, stirring, until custard coats the back of a spoon. Cool in a bowl.
  3. In a separate bowl whip whipping cream to soft peaks then fold into custard. Put in an ice cream maker to churn or freeze in a plastic tub for 3 hours. Break up, mix until smooth, freeze again and repeat.
  4. Dissolve remaining sugar in 4 tablespoons water in a pan over a medium heat. Bring to the boil and bubble to make caramel. Remove from heat, pour in cream, add salt and stir until smooth. Pour into a jug and serve with scoops of ice cream.

Cook’s tip
Salted caramel sauce will keep for up to 2 weeks in a jar in the fridge.

 

#saltedcaramel

#tripletested

#christmasrecipes

Best Bonfire Night Recipes

Our three favourite Bonfire Night recipes

 

Butternut Squash Velouté

Butternut Squash Velouté

  • Servings: 4
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Calories 362 per portion
Fat 31g (19g sat) per portion
Suitable for vegetarians
Suitable for freezing

Ingredients

  • Butter 50g (2oz)
  • Onions 2, peeled and sliced
  • Garlic 2 cloves, peeled and finely chopped
  • Butternut squash 700g (1lb 9oz), peeled and cubed
  • Vegetable stock 600ml (1 pint)
  • Double cream 150ml pot
  • Freshly grated nutmeg to serve (optional)
  • Toasted sourdough bread to serve (optional)

Instructions

  1. Melt butter in a large pan and add onions and garlic. Cover with a lid and leave to sweat over a low heat for 10 minutes or until softened.
  2. Add squash and stock and bring to the boil. Cover and simmer for 15 minutes or until squash has softened.
  3. Pour in half the cream, season to taste and puree with a stick blender. Serve with a swirl of cream, sprinkled with nutmeg and with sourdough toast, if you like.

 

Gingerbread

Extra Special Gooey Gingerbread

  • Servings: 18 bars
  • Difficulty: medium
  • Print

Calories 157 per portion
Fat 6g (3.5g sat) per portion
Suitable for vegetarians
Suitable for freezing

Ingredients

  • Butter 110g (4oz)
  • Granulated sugar 75g (3oz)
  • Golden syrup 225g (8oz)
  • Marmalade 2 tbsp
  • Self-raising flour 225g (8oz)
  • Ground ginger 2 tsp
  • Bicarbonate of soda ½ tsp
  • Milk 150ml (¼ pint)
  • Eggs 2

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 180°C/350°F/Gas 4. Butter a small roasting tin measuring about 18 x 28 x 4cm (7 x 11 x 1½in) and base line with non-stick baking paper.
  2. Put the butter, sugar, syrup and marmalade into a saucepan and heat, stirring, until the butter has melted and the sugar dissolved. Take the pan off the heat and leave to cool slightly.
  3. Mix the flour, ginger and bicarbonate of soda together in a bowl, then stir into the cooled butter and sugar mixture.
  4. Beat the milk and eggs together, then stir into the ginger mixture. Pour into the prepared tin, level the surface and cook for about 25 minutes until the cake is well risen and golden. The cake is ready when the top springs back when pressed with your fingertips.
  5. Leave the cake to cool in the tin, then take it out of the tin, peel off the paper and cut it into bars.

Cook’s tips
To store, wrap in foil and then keep in an airtight tub or tin.
It’s also delicious as a pudding with a splash of hot custard.

 

Peanut Butter Hot Chocolate

Peanut Butter Hot Chocolate

  • Servings: 2
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Calories 282 per portion
Fat 17g (7.6g sat) per portion
Suitable for vegetarians

Ingredients

  • Milk chocolate 40g (1½oz), broken up
  • Smooth peanut butter 2 tbsp
  • Milk 350ml (12fl oz)
  • Whipped cream 2 tbsp, optional
  • Mini marshmallows and grated chocolate to serve, optional

Instructions

  1. Place chocolate, peanut butter and milk in a pan. Heat gently, whisking, until chocolate has melted and mixture is smooth.
  2. Pour into 2 mugs and top with whipped cream and marshmallows and/or grated chocolate, if using.

 

Recipes taken from the Dairy Diary.

 

Dairy Diary 2018 now available

 

#bonfirenight
#recipes

The origins of Halloween and what to do with all that pumpkin

 Haloween Pumpkin

The origins of Halloween

The origins of Halloween can be traced back to the ancient Celtic festival of Samhain.*

Until 2,000 years ago, the Celts lived across the lands we now know as Britain, Ireland and northern France. Essentially a farming and agricultural people, the Pre-Christian Celtic year was determined by the growing seasons and Samhain marked the end of summer and the harvest and the beginning of the dark cold winter. The festival symbolised the boundary between the world of the living and the world of the dead.

It was believed by the Celts that on the night of 31st October, ghosts of their dead would revisit the mortal world and large bonfires were lit in each village in order to ward off any evil spirits that may also be at large.

The night or evening of Samhain became known
as All-hallows-even then Hallow Eve, still later
Hallowe’en and then of course Halloween.

A special time of the year when many believe that the spirit world can make contact with the physical world, a night when magic is at its most potent.

Throughout Britain, Halloween has traditionally been celebrated by children’s games such as bobbing for apples in containers full of water, telling ghost stories and the carving of faces into hollowed-out vegetables such as swedes and turnips. These faces would usually be illuminated from within by a candle, the lanterns displayed on window sills to ward off any evil spirits. The current use of pumpkins is a relatively modern innovation imported from the United States.

*Halloween by Ben Johnson

Pumpkin carving fun with your children

Halloween carved pumpkinChoose your pumpkin – a large, ripe pumpkin that has smooth, even surfaces and sits comfortably without danger of rolling over is best.

Sketch your pattern on paper to suit the size and shape of your pumpkin. If you’re not artistic, use a stencil or template.

Make the lid by drawing a 125mm (5″) circle on the top. Cut out the lid with the saw/blade at an angle – leaning slightly to the outside – this will stop the lid dropping inside. Remove the lid and clean its base.

The kids can remove the inside – they love this slimy job and can easily remove all the seeds and mushy stuff. Then you can takeover scraping with a spoon or ice-cream scoop. Thin walls make carving easier, but don’t make them too thin or the pumpkin will collapse. Make the base inside flat to accommodate a candle.

Apply your pattern by copying freehand onto the clean, dry pumpkin with a marker/pen/pencil or tape your paper pattern to the pumpkin and mark the design by poking holes through the pattern.

Let’s carve – adults only if you’re using a knife! Carefully begin at the centre of your pattern and work outward – small shapes first. The kids can push out the shapes as you go. Lastly ensure the pumpkin sits stably without danger of rolling.

Light up – place a tea-light in the base. Ensure the candle is level and carefully light it. Always extinguish the candle when leaving the room.

For a carving tool, we recommend a pumpkin saw. If you’re using a knife (small and sharp) carve gently and steadily, making a few gentle strokes for each cut.

 

And what to do with all that pumpkin?

Halloween Pumkin recipes from Dairy Diary

Here are four of our favourite Halloween recipes from the Dairy Diary team:

Halloween Pumpkin Streusel Muffins

Halloween Pumpkin Gratin

Pumpkin & Ginger Risotto

Halloween Cake Pops

 

Yes, we know the Halloween Pop Cakes don’t contain pumpkin, but they are too good to miss out!

Have fun!

 

#halloween

#pumpkin

 

 

 

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