Starter / snack

Recipe of the Week: Falafel Pittas with Fruity Crunchy Salad

Falafel Pittas with Fruity Crunchy Salad

 

Falafel Pittas with Fruity Crunchy Salad

Perfect for leftover fruits, salad, veg and bread. Mix and match what you have.

Time 20 minutes.
Per portion: 554 Kcal, 24g fat (3.2g saturated)
Serves 2
Suitable for vegetarians

  • Falafel about 200g (7oz)
  • Pitta bread 2
  • Crème fraîche 3 tbsp
  • Milk 1 tbsp
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • Red or white cabbage 50g (2oz), shredded
  • Dessert apple 1 small, peeled and chopped
  • Ready-to-eat dried apricots 25g (1oz), chopped
  • Raisins 15g (½oz)
  • Little gem lettuce 1, shredded
  • Tomato 1, sliced
  1. Preheat the oven and warm the falafel according to the packet’s instructions.
  2. Place the pitta bread in the oven during the last 3 minutes of cooking.
  3. Meanwhile, make the salad. In a medium-sized bowl whisk together the crème fraîche and milk and season to taste with salt and pepper. Add the cabbage, apple, apricots and raisins and mix well.
  4. Split open each pitta and fill with the lettuce and tomato and some of the fruity salad, then top with the falafel.
  5. Serve with the remaining fruity salad.

Cook’s tips
Make the salad quickly by popping the ingredients into a food processor and pulsing it a few times – add the cabbage first, then add any leftover dried fruit. Use any leftover crème fraîche to make a dip for crudités by mixing with herbs and grated cheese.

 


 

Fantastic Food For Less cookbookThis recipe is taken from our wonderful Fantastic Food for Less cookbook.
For more fantastic food, you can buy the book for just £5.99!!

FREE DELIVERY
Use the discount code DDPR and you’ll get free postage too!

ORDER NOW

 

#lovefoodhatewaste

#reducefoodwaste

#compost

#recipeoftheweek

#tripletested

 

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Top tips for reducing food waste part 2

Make your own compost

When I come to put out the bin for its fortnightly collection, I’ve noticed that our black rubbish bin is now only half full. Yay!

 

What it does contain a lot of, however, is fruit and vegetable peelings. And while my children would love me to bring home a peeling-loving guinea pig or rabbit, I think an easier option is a compost bin.

I’ve seen quite a few on sale cheap or even free on Gumtree and Facebook, but none are close to where I live. Our local authority recommend www.getcomposting.com, which seems pretty cheap – especially as I shouldn’t have to buy compost ever again.

Their top tips on composting are as follows:

  • Find the right site – Ideally site your compost bin in a reasonably sunny site on bare soil. If you have to put your compost bin on concrete, tarmac or patio slabs ensure there’s a layer of paper and twigs or existing compost on the bottom so the worms and other creatures can colonise. Choose a place where you can easily add ingredients to the bin and get the compost out.
  • Add the right ingredients – Have a container available such as a kitchen caddy or old ice cream tub so that you can collect items for your compost bin from all over the house. Fill your kitchen caddy or container with everything from vegetable and fruit peelings to teabags, toilet roll tubes, cereal boxes and eggshells. Take care not to compost cooked food, meat or fish.
  • Fill it up – Empty your kitchen caddy along with your garden waste into your compost bin. A 50/50 mix of greens and browns (see below) is the perfect recipe for good compost.
  • Wait a while – It takes between nine and twelve months for your compost to become ready for use, so now all you need to do is wait and let nature do the work. Keep on adding greens and browns to top up your compost.
  • Ready for use – Once your compost has turned into a crumbly, dark material, resembling thick, moist soil and gives off an earthy, fresh aroma, you know it’s ready to use.
  • Removing the compost – Lift the bin slightly or open the hatch at the bottom and scoop out the fresh compost with a garden fork, spade or trowel.
  • Use it – Don’t worry if your compost looks a little lumpy with twigs and bits of eggshells – this is perfectly normal. Use it to enrich borders and vegetable patches, plant up patio containers or feed the lawn.

So now, I’m all prepared to make my own
compost and reduce our contribution to
landfill in the process.

If your fruit, veg and salad are not quite compost-ready then use it in this scrummy recipe (mix and match what you have).

Pittas are in the method, but you could use wraps or other bread if it needs using up.

 

Falafel Pittas with Fruity Crunchy Salad

 

Falafel Pittas with Fruity Crunchy Salad

Time 20 minutes.
Per portion: 554 Kcal, 24g fat (3.2g saturated)
Serves 2
Suitable for vegetarians

  • Falafel about 200g (7oz)
  • Pitta bread 2
  • Crème fraîche 3 tbsp
  • Milk 1 tbsp
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • Red or white cabbage 50g (2oz), shredded
  • Dessert apple 1 small, peeled and chopped
  • Ready-to-eat dried apricots 25g (1oz), chopped
  • Raisins 15g (½oz)
  • Little gem lettuce 1, shredded
  • Tomato 1, sliced
  1. Preheat the oven and warm the falafel according to the packet’s instructions.
  2. Place the pitta bread in the oven during the last 3 minutes of cooking.
  3. Meanwhile, make the salad. In a medium-sized bowl whisk together the crème fraîche and milk and season to taste with salt and pepper. Add the cabbage, apple, apricots and raisins and mix well.
  4. Split open each pitta and fill with the lettuce and tomato and some of the fruity salad, then top with the falafel.
  5. Serve with the remaining fruity salad.

Cook’s tips
Make the salad quickly by popping the ingredients into a food processor and pulsing it a few times – add the cabbage first, then add any leftover dried fruit. Use any leftover crème fraîche to make a dip for crudités by mixing with herbs and grated cheese.

 


 

Fantastic Food For Less cookbookThis recipe is taken from our wonderful Fantastic Food for Less cookbook.
For more fantastic food, you can buy the book for just £5.99!!

FREE DELIVERY
Use the discount code DDPR and you’ll get free postage too!

ORDER NOW

 

#lovefoodhatewaste

#reducefoodwaste

#compost

#recipeoftheweek

#tripletested

 

Recipe of the Week | Autumn Super Salad

Autumn Super Salad

Salad is not for autumn, right?

Wrong!

This delicious Autumn Super Salad from Dairy Diary will change your mind.

Serves 2
Time 30 mins
Per serving: Calories 295. Fat 13g of which 5g is saturated

Colourful, nutritious and filling. Try it this week.

Autumn Super Salad

 


 

Dairy Diary 2018

The Autumn Super Salad recipe is one of the weekly inspirational recipes featured in the Dairy Diary 2018.

Dairy Diary 20182018 Dairy Diary 

A unique A5, week-to-view diary that’s both practical and pretty – the perfect choice for planning your busy life.
And with sales of over 30 million Dairy Diary has been Britain’s favourite home diary since 1982.

Amazing value at just £8.50!

COMING SOON

 

 

The origins of Halloween and what to do with all that pumpkin

 Haloween Pumpkin

The origins of Halloween

The origins of Halloween can be traced back to the ancient Celtic festival of Samhain.*

Until 2,000 years ago, the Celts lived across the lands we now know as Britain, Ireland and northern France. Essentially a farming and agricultural people, the Pre-Christian Celtic year was determined by the growing seasons and Samhain marked the end of summer and the harvest and the beginning of the dark cold winter. The festival symbolised the boundary between the world of the living and the world of the dead.

It was believed by the Celts that on the night of 31st October, ghosts of their dead would revisit the mortal world and large bonfires were lit in each village in order to ward off any evil spirits that may also be at large.

The night or evening of Samhain became known
as All-hallows-even then Hallow Eve, still later
Hallowe’en and then of course Halloween.

A special time of the year when many believe that the spirit world can make contact with the physical world, a night when magic is at its most potent.

Throughout Britain, Halloween has traditionally been celebrated by children’s games such as bobbing for apples in containers full of water, telling ghost stories and the carving of faces into hollowed-out vegetables such as swedes and turnips. These faces would usually be illuminated from within by a candle, the lanterns displayed on window sills to ward off any evil spirits. The current use of pumpkins is a relatively modern innovation imported from the United States.

*Halloween by Ben Johnson

Pumpkin carving fun with your children

Halloween carved pumpkinChoose your pumpkin – a large, ripe pumpkin that has smooth, even surfaces and sits comfortably without danger of rolling over is best.

Sketch your pattern on paper to suit the size and shape of your pumpkin. If you’re not artistic, use a stencil or template.

Make the lid by drawing a 125mm (5″) circle on the top. Cut out the lid with the saw/blade at an angle – leaning slightly to the outside – this will stop the lid dropping inside. Remove the lid and clean its base.

The kids can remove the inside – they love this slimy job and can easily remove all the seeds and mushy stuff. Then you can takeover scraping with a spoon or ice-cream scoop. Thin walls make carving easier, but don’t make them too thin or the pumpkin will collapse. Make the base inside flat to accommodate a candle.

Apply your pattern by copying freehand onto the clean, dry pumpkin with a marker/pen/pencil or tape your paper pattern to the pumpkin and mark the design by poking holes through the pattern.

Let’s carve – adults only if you’re using a knife! Carefully begin at the centre of your pattern and work outward – small shapes first. The kids can push out the shapes as you go. Lastly ensure the pumpkin sits stably without danger of rolling.

Light up – place a tea-light in the base. Ensure the candle is level and carefully light it. Always extinguish the candle when leaving the room.

For a carving tool, we recommend a pumpkin saw. If you’re using a knife (small and sharp) carve gently and steadily, making a few gentle strokes for each cut.

 

And what to do with all that pumpkin?

Halloween Pumkin recipes from Dairy Diary

Here are four of our favourite Halloween recipes from the Dairy Diary team:

Halloween Pumpkin Streusel Muffins

Halloween Pumpkin Gratin

Pumpkin & Ginger Risotto

Halloween Cake Pops

 

Yes, we know the Halloween Pop Cakes don’t contain pumpkin, but they are too good to miss out!

Have fun!

 

#halloween

#pumpkin

 

 

 

Special Summer Sale

Get a whopping 50% off
these fabulous cookbooks!

But only while stocks last.

50% off selected cookbooks

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Don’t miss this opportunity to buy a super cookbook from the publishers of the Dairy Diary at half price!

With over 3 million sales we know our books are loved, by novice and experienced cooks alike, throughout the UK.

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Choose from:

Dairy Diary Favourites – was £8.25, now £4.12

Just for One or Two – was £8.25, now £4.12

Dairy Book of Home Cookery – was £10.49, now £5.24

Fantastic Food For Less – was £5.99, now £2.99

Take a Box of Eggs – was £7.49, now £3.74

 

Buy now at DairyDiary.co.uk

Offer closes 24 August 2017.


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Recipe of the Week: French-Style Couscous with Prawns

French-style Couscous with Prawns

 

A really simple combination of ingredients, but packed full of flavour, and perfect for your lunchbox.

French-Style Couscous with Prawns

  • Servings: 2
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Calories 310 per portion
Fat 2.2g (0.4g sat) per portion

Ingredients

  • Couscous 110g (4oz)
  • Sundried tomato paste 1 tbsp
  • Chicken stock 200ml (7fl oz), boiling
  • Cooked king prawns 150g pack
  • Tomatoes 2, diced
  • Cucumber 7cm (3in) piece, diced
  • Frozen peas 75g (3oz), cooked
  • Chopped mint 2-3 tbsp

Instructions

  1. Place couscous in a large bowl. Stir sundried tomato paste into stock and then pour onto couscous. Stir, cover, then leave for 5 minutes.
  2. Fluff up couscous with a fork then leave to cool.
  3. Stir in remaining ingredients, season to taste and serve immediately.

Recipe taken from Dairy Diary 2017.

#tripletested

#recipeoftheweek

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