Starter / snack

Recipe of the Week | Autumn Super Salad

Autumn Super Salad

Salad is not for autumn, right?

Wrong!

This delicious Autumn Super Salad from Dairy Diary will change your mind.

Serves 2
Time 30 mins
Per serving: Calories 295. Fat 13g of which 5g is saturated

Colourful, nutritious and filling. Try it this week.

Autumn Super Salad

 


 

Dairy Diary 2018

The Autumn Super Salad recipe is one of the weekly inspirational recipes featured in the Dairy Diary 2018.

Dairy Diary 20182018 Dairy Diary 

A unique A5, week-to-view diary that’s both practical and pretty – the perfect choice for planning your busy life.
And with sales of over 30 million Dairy Diary has been Britain’s favourite home diary since 1982.

Amazing value at just £8.50!

COMING SOON

 

 

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The origins of Halloween and what to do with all that pumpkin

 Haloween Pumpkin

The origins of Halloween

The origins of Halloween can be traced back to the ancient Celtic festival of Samhain.*

Until 2,000 years ago, the Celts lived across the lands we now know as Britain, Ireland and northern France. Essentially a farming and agricultural people, the Pre-Christian Celtic year was determined by the growing seasons and Samhain marked the end of summer and the harvest and the beginning of the dark cold winter. The festival symbolised the boundary between the world of the living and the world of the dead.

It was believed by the Celts that on the night of 31st October, ghosts of their dead would revisit the mortal world and large bonfires were lit in each village in order to ward off any evil spirits that may also be at large.

The night or evening of Samhain became known
as All-hallows-even then Hallow Eve, still later
Hallowe’en and then of course Halloween.

A special time of the year when many believe that the spirit world can make contact with the physical world, a night when magic is at its most potent.

Throughout Britain, Halloween has traditionally been celebrated by children’s games such as bobbing for apples in containers full of water, telling ghost stories and the carving of faces into hollowed-out vegetables such as swedes and turnips. These faces would usually be illuminated from within by a candle, the lanterns displayed on window sills to ward off any evil spirits. The current use of pumpkins is a relatively modern innovation imported from the United States.

*Halloween by Ben Johnson

Pumpkin carving fun with your children

Halloween carved pumpkinChoose your pumpkin – a large, ripe pumpkin that has smooth, even surfaces and sits comfortably without danger of rolling over is best.

Sketch your pattern on paper to suit the size and shape of your pumpkin. If you’re not artistic, use a stencil or template.

Make the lid by drawing a 125mm (5″) circle on the top. Cut out the lid with the saw/blade at an angle – leaning slightly to the outside – this will stop the lid dropping inside. Remove the lid and clean its base.

The kids can remove the inside – they love this slimy job and can easily remove all the seeds and mushy stuff. Then you can takeover scraping with a spoon or ice-cream scoop. Thin walls make carving easier, but don’t make them too thin or the pumpkin will collapse. Make the base inside flat to accommodate a candle.

Apply your pattern by copying freehand onto the clean, dry pumpkin with a marker/pen/pencil or tape your paper pattern to the pumpkin and mark the design by poking holes through the pattern.

Let’s carve – adults only if you’re using a knife! Carefully begin at the centre of your pattern and work outward – small shapes first. The kids can push out the shapes as you go. Lastly ensure the pumpkin sits stably without danger of rolling.

Light up – place a tea-light in the base. Ensure the candle is level and carefully light it. Always extinguish the candle when leaving the room.

For a carving tool, we recommend a pumpkin saw. If you’re using a knife (small and sharp) carve gently and steadily, making a few gentle strokes for each cut.

 

And what to do with all that pumpkin?

Halloween Pumkin recipes from Dairy Diary

Here are four of our favourite Halloween recipes from the Dairy Diary team:

Halloween Pumpkin Streusel Muffins

Halloween Pumpkin Gratin

Pumpkin & Ginger Risotto

Halloween Cake Pops

 

Yes, we know the Halloween Pop Cakes don’t contain pumpkin, but they are too good to miss out!

Have fun!

 

#halloween

#pumpkin

 

 

 

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But only while stocks last.

50% off selected cookbooks

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Offer closes 24 August 2017.


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Recipe of the Week: French-Style Couscous with Prawns

French-style Couscous with Prawns

 

A really simple combination of ingredients, but packed full of flavour, and perfect for your lunchbox.

French-Style Couscous with Prawns

  • Servings: 2
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Calories 310 per portion
Fat 2.2g (0.4g sat) per portion

Ingredients

  • Couscous 110g (4oz)
  • Sundried tomato paste 1 tbsp
  • Chicken stock 200ml (7fl oz), boiling
  • Cooked king prawns 150g pack
  • Tomatoes 2, diced
  • Cucumber 7cm (3in) piece, diced
  • Frozen peas 75g (3oz), cooked
  • Chopped mint 2-3 tbsp

Instructions

  1. Place couscous in a large bowl. Stir sundried tomato paste into stock and then pour onto couscous. Stir, cover, then leave for 5 minutes.
  2. Fluff up couscous with a fork then leave to cool.
  3. Stir in remaining ingredients, season to taste and serve immediately.

Recipe taken from Dairy Diary 2017.

#tripletested

#recipeoftheweek

Liven up your lunchbox this week

Many (many) years’ ago, I endured a two week long school exchange trip to the Limousin region of France.

As a 13-year-old staying with an extremely eccentric family in an even more eccentric cobweb-strewn house (half of which appeared to be a long-abandoned cabaret café), I found the whole experience challenging to say the least. Never before, or since, have I experienced such a longing for home.

It was such a vivid experience, however, that much of it has stayed with me, including the flavours of the local cuisine.

This trip was undoubtedly
the catalyst for my life-long
love of food.

The whole family were superb cooks, and I tasted the most delicious pastas, pâtés and crêpes. One particularly memorable couscous dish was served at the local village fête. I’d never even heard of couscous, let alone tasted it, but I loved the combination of flavours and textures.

I’ve done my best to recreate this recipe almost 30 years’ later in the 2017 Dairy Diary. It’s really easy to make, and can be made in advance and chilled, so it’s ideal for a portable lunch, and much more interesting than the ubiquitous cheese sandwich.

 

French-style Couscous with Prawns

 

French-Style Couscous with Prawns

  • Servings: 2
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Calories 310 per portion
Fat 2.2g (0.4g sat) per portion

Ingredients

  • Couscous 110g (4oz)
  • Sundried tomato paste 1 tbsp
  • Chicken stock 200ml (7fl oz), boiling
  • Cooked king prawns 150g pack
  • Tomatoes 2, diced
  • Cucumber 7cm (3in) piece, diced
  • Frozen peas 75g (3oz), cooked
  • Chopped mint 2-3 tbsp

Instructions

  1. Place couscous in a large bowl. Stir sundried tomato paste into stock and then pour onto couscous. Stir, cover, then leave for 5 minutes.
  2. Fluff up couscous with a fork then leave to cool.
  3. Stir in remaining ingredients, season to taste and serve immediately.

Recipe taken from Dairy Diary 2017.

#tripletested

British Sandwich Week

British Sandwich Week

According to the British Sandwich Week website we Brits eat over 11.5 billion sandwiches each year. If you laid each one end to end, they would go around the world about 44 times!

British Sandwich Week is a week-long celebration of the greatest food-to-go and one of the most iconic British culinary inventions; the Sandwich.

The great British sandwich is such a central item in our psyche and culture that we have more different names for it than Eskimos do for snow.

From Sarnies, butties and barms to baps and baguettes, everywhere you go there’s a local term for this icon. Ever since John Montague, the 4th Earl of Sandwich ordered cold beef between slices of toast, to avoid getting up from his cards game, his name has become synonymous with the delectable dish.

So what’s your favourite?

Do you prefer to make your own or do you have a favourite café? We love our local bakery. It’s certainly not hip and trendy but it produces the most gorgeous bread and fillings. But when we’re not indulging in purchases from

But when we’re not indulging in purchases from Food for Thought our favourite seasonal sandwich recipe is Asparagus Torpedoes (see below).

 


 

 

Win a Greville Sandwich Press

WIN a Fab Breville Sandwich Press

With the Breville VST025 sandwich toaster, delicious toasted sandwiches can be quickly prepared from handy ingredients. It’s quick, easy and offers endless options–from sweet to savoury–for anyone who fancies a light lunch or a quick snack.

Good luck!

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Asparagus Torpedo

Asparagus Torpedoes

  • Servings: 2
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Calories 641 per portion
Fat 29g (9g sat) per portion
Suitable for vegetarians

Ingredients

  • Ready-to-bake baguettes 2
  • Asparagus spears 6–8, depending on size
  • Mayonnaise 3 tbsp
  • Finely shredded basil 3 tbsp
  • Finely chopped parsley 3 tbsp
  • Beefsteak tomato 1, sliced
  • Mozzarella cheese 90g (31⁄2oz), thinly sliced

Instructions

  1. As instructed on the packet, preheat oven and bake baguettes, then allow to cool.
  2. Meanwhile, snap off white woody ends of asparagus. Cook spears in gently boiling water for 3–5 minutes until tender. Drain, cut in half lengthways, then into thirds.
  3. Cut baguettes almost into two lengthways. Mix mayonnaise with basil and parsley and spread over cut sides. 4 Alternate slices of tomato, mozzarella and pieces of asparagus in the baguettes. Season with freshly ground black pepper and serve immediately while warm.

 

A Dairy Diary recipe.

#sandwichweek

#britishasparagus

#win

#competition

#prizedraw

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