Tag Archives: Dairy Diary 2018

Recipe of the Week: Fish with Oregano Butter & Cauliflower

Fish with Oregano Butter

Fish with Oregano Butter & Cauliflower

Delicious, just-cooked cod or hake fillet on a bed of creamy cauliflower.

And it only takes 25 minutes to cook!

Serves 2
Time 25 mins
Per serving: Calories 688. Fat 51g of which 28g is saturated

Healthy and delicious. Try it this week.

Autumn Super Salad

 


 

 

The Fish with Oregano Butter & Cauliflower recipe is one of the weekly inspirational recipes featured in the Dairy Diary 2018.

Dairy Diary 20182018 Dairy Diary 

A unique A5, week-to-view diary that’s both practical and pretty – the perfect choice for planning your busy life.
And with sales of over 30 million Dairy Diary has been Britain’s favourite home diary since 1982.

Amazing value at just £8.50!

COMING SOON

 

#recipeoftheweek

#tripletested

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The origins of Halloween and what to do with all that pumpkin

 Haloween Pumpkin

The origins of Halloween

The origins of Halloween can be traced back to the ancient Celtic festival of Samhain.*

Until 2,000 years ago, the Celts lived across the lands we now know as Britain, Ireland and northern France. Essentially a farming and agricultural people, the Pre-Christian Celtic year was determined by the growing seasons and Samhain marked the end of summer and the harvest and the beginning of the dark cold winter. The festival symbolised the boundary between the world of the living and the world of the dead.

It was believed by the Celts that on the night of 31st October, ghosts of their dead would revisit the mortal world and large bonfires were lit in each village in order to ward off any evil spirits that may also be at large.

The night or evening of Samhain became known
as All-hallows-even then Hallow Eve, still later
Hallowe’en and then of course Halloween.

A special time of the year when many believe that the spirit world can make contact with the physical world, a night when magic is at its most potent.

Throughout Britain, Halloween has traditionally been celebrated by children’s games such as bobbing for apples in containers full of water, telling ghost stories and the carving of faces into hollowed-out vegetables such as swedes and turnips. These faces would usually be illuminated from within by a candle, the lanterns displayed on window sills to ward off any evil spirits. The current use of pumpkins is a relatively modern innovation imported from the United States.

*Halloween by Ben Johnson

Pumpkin carving fun with your children

Halloween carved pumpkinChoose your pumpkin – a large, ripe pumpkin that has smooth, even surfaces and sits comfortably without danger of rolling over is best.

Sketch your pattern on paper to suit the size and shape of your pumpkin. If you’re not artistic, use a stencil or template.

Make the lid by drawing a 125mm (5″) circle on the top. Cut out the lid with the saw/blade at an angle – leaning slightly to the outside – this will stop the lid dropping inside. Remove the lid and clean its base.

The kids can remove the inside – they love this slimy job and can easily remove all the seeds and mushy stuff. Then you can takeover scraping with a spoon or ice-cream scoop. Thin walls make carving easier, but don’t make them too thin or the pumpkin will collapse. Make the base inside flat to accommodate a candle.

Apply your pattern by copying freehand onto the clean, dry pumpkin with a marker/pen/pencil or tape your paper pattern to the pumpkin and mark the design by poking holes through the pattern.

Let’s carve – adults only if you’re using a knife! Carefully begin at the centre of your pattern and work outward – small shapes first. The kids can push out the shapes as you go. Lastly ensure the pumpkin sits stably without danger of rolling.

Light up – place a tea-light in the base. Ensure the candle is level and carefully light it. Always extinguish the candle when leaving the room.

For a carving tool, we recommend a pumpkin saw. If you’re using a knife (small and sharp) carve gently and steadily, making a few gentle strokes for each cut.

 

And what to do with all that pumpkin?

Halloween Pumkin recipes from Dairy Diary

Here are four of our favourite Halloween recipes from the Dairy Diary team:

Halloween Pumpkin Streusel Muffins

Halloween Pumpkin Gratin

Pumpkin & Ginger Risotto

Halloween Cake Pops

 

Yes, we know the Halloween Pop Cakes don’t contain pumpkin, but they are too good to miss out!

Have fun!

 

#halloween

#pumpkin

 

 

 

Celebrate National Baking Week

Chocolate and Nut Chelsea Buns

Celebrate National Baking Week with these delicious Choc ‘n’ Nut Chelsea Buns

Choc ‘n’ Nut Chelsea Buns

  • Servings: 12
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Calories 342 per portion
Fat 27g (16g sat) per portion
Suitable for vegetarians
Suitable for freezing

Ingredients

  • Strong plain flour 350g (12oz)
  • Caster sugar 50g (2oz)
  • Salt 1 tsp
  • Fast-action dried yeast 7g sachet
  • Butter 50g (2oz), melted
  • Egg 1, beaten
  • Milk 150ml (¼ pint), lukewarm
  • Nutella 200g jar
  • Roasted chopped hazelnuts 75g (3oz)
  • Plain chocolate chips 100g (3½oz)
  • Icing sugar for dusting

Instructions

  1. In a mixing bowl stir together flour, sugar, salt and yeast. Mix together butter, egg and milk in a jug then pour into the bowl and mix together to form a dough. On a floured surface knead the dough for 5-10 minutes then roll out to a rectangle 25 x 35cm (10 x 14in).
  2. Spread Nutella onto dough leaving one long edge clear. Sprinkle with half the nuts and chocolate chips. Roll up towards clear edge and press well to join.
  3. Slice dough into 12 and place in a buttered 18 x 28cm  (7 x 11in) traybake tin in three rows of four. Cover loosely with oiled cling film and leave in a warm place until doubled in size.
  4. Preheat oven to 200°C/180°fan/Gas 6. Bake for 20-30 minutes until firm. Transfer to a rack, scatter with chocolate chips, nuts and icing sugar.

Recipe taken from the Dairy Diary 2018.

Dairy Diary 2018 now available

 

 

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