Tag Archives: Lavender

Scented Pots & Win a Garden Centre Voucher

4 Steps to a Gorgeous Scented Pot

Having a supply of fresh home-grown herbs is really useful, and much cheaper than purchasing them from the supermarket.

And in this project, they look (and smell) gorgeous too.

This planted pot would look fabulous stood by the front door and will welcome you home with fragrant aromas.

 

Bay, Thyme and Lavender

Bay, Thyme and Lavender

Three strongly aromatic plants combine here to make an enticingly scented corner. A standard bay in a large ceramic pot is circled by a medley of low-growing thymes, with lavender surrounding the base.

Plant in spring. All of these plants have a year-long presence – bay and thyme are evergreen, while lavender, which flowers in summer, retains its grey leaves throughout winter.

Allow a couple of hours to complete this container and the surrounding bed.

Plants

  • One bay tree (Laurus nobilis), trained to standard shape and clipped to a ball.
  • Eight thymes (Thymus serpyllum and Thymus citriodorus varieties – here golden leaved, variegated and grey-leaved forms as well as the more usual dark green).
  • Eight lavenders (Lavandula variety, such as ‘Munstead’).

Equipment

  • Large ceramic container (or any other pot large enough to take the bay tree).
  • Soil-based potting compost with added grit or sharp sand for drainage.
  • Broken crocks for drainage.
  • Trowel.

1 Position your pot where it is to stand – it will be too heavy to move once planted. Here the pot is surrounded by a narrow bed of lavender which will need about 45cm (18in) of planting space all around the pot.

2 Line the container with broken crocks for drainage, then half-fill with compost. Check the level of the bay’s rootball by placing it in its original pot on the compost. Adjust the level as necessary to get the rootball to the same depth it was in before, then plant the bay, placing it centrally in the pot. Firm in.

3 Top up the container with more compost – the thymes will have much shallower rootballs than the bay. Plant the thymes in a circle around the bay, firm in, then top up again with more compost to within 2.5cm (1in) of the rim. Water thoroughly.

4 Work some of the compost/grit mix into the soil around the pot, then plant the lavenders all round. Water thoroughly.

Tips

If you wish, choose a dry, sunny day and cut some of the lavender flowers when they are at their peak. Leave them to dry in bunches, then use them in a vase or a potpourri, or make little sachets and stuff them with the lavender flowerheads – place in linen drawers or hang in clothes cupboards to keep the clothes smelling fresh and sweet.

Note

Both the bay and the thymes are culinary herbs, so use them freely in your cooking.

Aftercare

All these plants do best in full sun and need light, well-drained soil. Keep the bay in shape by trimming any straggly shoots in summer; remove any frost-damaged leaves/shoots in spring. Remove faded lavender flowers in autumn, then prune in April – but do not cut into old wood. Clip the thyme, removing dead flowerheads and straggly shoots in spring.

This little project is taken from our Seasonal Garden Ideas book. Find out…

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Recipe of the Week: Iced Lavender Loaf

Iced Lavender Loaf

Fragrant and very, very pretty, this cake is irresistible.

Iced Lavender Loaf

  • Servings: 2 loaves
  • Time: 35 mins
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Calories 176 per portion
Fat 10g (6g sat) per portion
Suitable for vegetarians
Suitable for freezing

Ingredients

  • Milk 75ml (3fl oz)
  • Fresh lavender flower heads 6, plus extra for decoration, or 1 tsp dried lavender
  • Unsalted butter 175g (6oz) softened
  • Caster sugar 175g (6oz)
  • Lemon 1, finely grated zest
  • Eggs 3, beaten
  • Self-raising flour 175g (6oz)
  • Icing sugar 225g (8oz)
  • Violet food colouring

Instructions

  1. Put milk and flower heads, or dried lavender, in a small pan and bring slowly to simmering point over a low heat. Remove from heat, cover and set aside for 30 minutes.
  2. Strain milk into a bowl and discard lavender.
  3. Preheat oven to 180°C/Gas 4.
  4. Beat butter, caster sugar and lemon zest together until soft and creamy. Beat in eggs a little at a time, adding a tablespoon of flour with each egg. Fold in remaining flour and 2 tablespoons of lavender milk.
  5. Spoon the mixture into two loaf tins and level the top of each one. Stand the tins on a baking sheet and bake for 35 minutes or until a skewer comes out clean.
  6. Leave to cool in tins for 10 minutes before turning out onto a wire rack to cool completely.
  7. Sieve icing sugar into a bowl and stir in enough lavender milk to make a smooth paste that just holds its shape. Tint icing by mixing in a little violet food colouring and then spread it over tops of cakes with a palette knife. Decorate each cake with small sprigs of lavender flowers. Leave to set before serving.

 

A Dairy Diary recipe.

 

#recipeoftheweek

#tripletested

4 Steps to a Fabulous Fragrant Pot

4-Steps-to-a-Fabulous-Fragrant-Pot

At the moment, I have a rather sad looking pot of mint by the sink. It needs a proper place to live as it’s bedraggled and neglected. 

I absolutely love the scent of herbs and would love to create somewhere special for them to grow and be nurtured so that we can use them in salads and stews and enjoy the aroma.

After browsing through our Seasonal Garden Ideas book I have decided to do this project (adding in my little pot of mint). It will look fabulous by the front door, will create a wonderful aroma as we pass into the house and give me an easily accessible supply of delicious herbs. I can’t wait to get started!

 

Bay, Thyme & Lavender

Three strongly aromatic plants combine here to make an enticingly scented corner. A  standard bay in a large ceramic pot is circled by a medley of low-growing thymes, with lavender surrounding the base.

Plant in spring.
All of these plants have a year-long presence – bay and thyme are evergreen, while lavender, which flowers in summer, retains its grey leaves throughout winter.

Allow a couple of hours to complete this container and the surrounding bed.


What you need

Plants

  • One bay tree (Laurus nobilis), trained to standard shape and clipped to a ball.
  • Eight thymes (Thymus serpyllum and Thymus citriodorus varieties – here golden leaved, variegated and grey-leaved forms as well as the more usual dark green).
  • Eight lavenders (Lavandula variety, such as ‘Munstead’).

Equipment

  • Large ceramic container (or any other pot large enough to take the bay tree).
  • Soil-based potting compost with added grit or sharp sand for drainage.
  • Broken crocks for drainage.
  • Trowel.

Instructions

  1. Position your pot where it is to stand – it will be too heavy to move once planted. Here the pot is surrounded by a narrow bed of lavender which will need about 45cm (18in) of planting space all around the pot.
  2. Line the container with broken crocks for drainage, then half-fill with compost. Check the level of the bay’s rootball by placing it in its original pot on the compost. Adjust the level as necessary to get the rootball to the same depth it was in before, then plant the bay, placing it centrally in the pot. Firm in.
  3. Top up the container with more compost – the thymes will have much shallower rootballs than the bay. Plant the thymes in a circle around the bay, firm in, then top up again with more compost to within 2.5cm (1in) of the rim. Water thoroughly.
  4. Work some of the compost/grit mix into the soil around the pot, then plant the lavenders all round. Water thoroughly.

Tips
If you wish, choose a dry, sunny day and cut some of the lavender flowers when they are at their peak. Leave them to dry in bunches, then use them in a vase or a potpourri, or make little sachets and stuff them with the lavender flowerheads – place in linen drawers or hang in clothes cupboards to keep the clothes smelling fresh and sweet.

Note
Both the bay and the thymes are culinary herbs, so use them freely in your cooking.

Aftercare
All these plants do best in full sun and need light, well-drained soil. Keep the bay in shape by trimming any straggly shoots in summer; remove any frost-damaged leaves/shoots in spring. Remove faded lavender flowers in autumn, then prune in April – but do not cut into old wood. Clip the thyme, removing dead flowerheads and straggly shoots in spring.


 

Seasonal Garden Ideas £3.99Seasonal Garden Ideas
is available for just £3.99!

A perfect gift for your
green-fingered friends.

 

#gardening

#easypots

#growourownherbs

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