Tag Archives: pots

Scented Pots & Win a Garden Centre Voucher

4 Steps to a Gorgeous Scented Pot

Having a supply of fresh home-grown herbs is really useful, and much cheaper than purchasing them from the supermarket.

And in this project, they look (and smell) gorgeous too.

This planted pot would look fabulous stood by the front door and will welcome you home with fragrant aromas.

 

Bay, Thyme and Lavender

Bay, Thyme and Lavender

Three strongly aromatic plants combine here to make an enticingly scented corner. A standard bay in a large ceramic pot is circled by a medley of low-growing thymes, with lavender surrounding the base.

Plant in spring. All of these plants have a year-long presence – bay and thyme are evergreen, while lavender, which flowers in summer, retains its grey leaves throughout winter.

Allow a couple of hours to complete this container and the surrounding bed.

Plants

  • One bay tree (Laurus nobilis), trained to standard shape and clipped to a ball.
  • Eight thymes (Thymus serpyllum and Thymus citriodorus varieties – here golden leaved, variegated and grey-leaved forms as well as the more usual dark green).
  • Eight lavenders (Lavandula variety, such as ‘Munstead’).

Equipment

  • Large ceramic container (or any other pot large enough to take the bay tree).
  • Soil-based potting compost with added grit or sharp sand for drainage.
  • Broken crocks for drainage.
  • Trowel.

1 Position your pot where it is to stand – it will be too heavy to move once planted. Here the pot is surrounded by a narrow bed of lavender which will need about 45cm (18in) of planting space all around the pot.

2 Line the container with broken crocks for drainage, then half-fill with compost. Check the level of the bay’s rootball by placing it in its original pot on the compost. Adjust the level as necessary to get the rootball to the same depth it was in before, then plant the bay, placing it centrally in the pot. Firm in.

3 Top up the container with more compost – the thymes will have much shallower rootballs than the bay. Plant the thymes in a circle around the bay, firm in, then top up again with more compost to within 2.5cm (1in) of the rim. Water thoroughly.

4 Work some of the compost/grit mix into the soil around the pot, then plant the lavenders all round. Water thoroughly.

Tips

If you wish, choose a dry, sunny day and cut some of the lavender flowers when they are at their peak. Leave them to dry in bunches, then use them in a vase or a potpourri, or make little sachets and stuff them with the lavender flowerheads – place in linen drawers or hang in clothes cupboards to keep the clothes smelling fresh and sweet.

Note

Both the bay and the thymes are culinary herbs, so use them freely in your cooking.

Aftercare

All these plants do best in full sun and need light, well-drained soil. Keep the bay in shape by trimming any straggly shoots in summer; remove any frost-damaged leaves/shoots in spring. Remove faded lavender flowers in autumn, then prune in April – but do not cut into old wood. Clip the thyme, removing dead flowerheads and straggly shoots in spring.

This little project is taken from our Seasonal Garden Ideas book. Find out…

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The secrets to year-round colour in your garden

Dairy Diary 2017 gardening feature

The secrets to year-round colour in your garden

 

Now the weather has got colder and those summer bedding plants have died down it’s time to do a little creative planting to give your home that va va voom.

There may not be an abundance of bedding plants to choose from at this time of year but you can still add kerb appeal with pots and baskets and a few well-chosen specimens.

2017 A5 diaries

2017 diary, A5 week-to-view with recipesFor a display that will see you through until spring choose a few small heathers in deep red or rust colours, some cyclamen and also a few silvery-coloured plants, such as Senecio Maritima ‘Silver Dust’ (Silver Ragwort).

 

Underplant with tulip bulbs and these will appear in spring. If the cyclamen fade early you can replace with Christmas roses. I’ve also chosen a gorgeous Skimmia Japonica to place in a pot by the front door.

 

The 2017 Dairy Diary has a fantastic feature on gardening for year-round colour, with tips on colour schemes and what to plant when for a gorgeous year-round floral display. It even gives a list of glamorous gardens to visit.

2017 A5 diary


Dairy Diary 2017Dairy Diary is available to buy for just £7.99.

Click here for more information, but don’t dilly dally as they’re selling fast.

 

 

 

 

 

#gardening

#autumncolour

#kerbappeal

 

 

A Splash of Colour and Instant Curb Appeal in 4 Simple Steps

PLANTING SPRING POTS

A Splash of Colour and Instant Curb Appeal in 4 Simple Steps

Garden centres are filling up with beddings plants and we can finally say goodbye to winter on Sunday with the official start of spring.

Celebrate the new season by creating a splash of colour at the front of your house.

For just a few pounds and a few minutes
you can give your home instant curb
appeal with some gorgeous flowers.

In this feature from our Seasonal Garden Ideas book we show you show.


 

Playing a Supporting Role

A single giant pot with a very large plant can look a bit stark – surrounding it with smaller containers holding a variety of colourful flowers will soften the overall effect.

Buy a bedding strip of pansies, and several pots of white narcissi in bud in March for flowering in April and May.

Planting one pot like this takes less than an hour, but if you want to surround a large container with many smaller ones, allow an afternoon for the job.

 

What you need

Plants

  • Bedding strip of six to eight blue pansy (Viola) plantlets.
  • Six white Narcissus ‘Petrel’ in bud.

Equipment

  • Terracotta pot.
  • Soil-based potting compost.
  • Broken crocks for drainage.
  • Trowel.
  • Extra terracotta pots, if required, to surround the planted container.

1 Line the terracotta pot with a layer of broken crocks for drainage.

2 Start filling with compost, then ascertain the right height for the narcissi by placing them in their pot on the compost – the rootball/bulbs should be about 4cm (1½in) below the rim of the terracotta pot.

3 Position all the narcissi, spacing them out as evenly as possible, firm in by twisting each one slightly, then top with more compost.

4 Plant the pansies in the same way, positioning them around and in front of the pot. Firm them in, finishing with a final layer of compost. Bump the pot gently to settle the plants and compost, then water thoroughly.

Tip

The beauty of this arrangement is that when the pansies and narcissi have finished flowering, you can replace the whole pot with another display. With the wide range of narcissi and pansy colours available, you can choose any number of variations on this theme – or go for something completely different.

Note

The pansies may well flower a lot longer than the white narcissi. In this case, cut down the narcissi stalks when the flowers have withered and allow the pansies to continue on their own.

Aftercare

Deadhead the pansies regularly to ensure a long and continuing display of flowers. If the narcissi start bending over (in high winds or rain), support with thin bamboo canes and soft string ties.

Seasonal Garden Ideas if available for just £3.99 at http://www.dairydiary.co.uk/gift-books.html

 

#springflowers

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