Tag Archives: Home-made

Ploughman’s Lunch Chutney

No Ploughman’s Lunch is complete without this great Chutney.

Ploughman's Lunch

Ploughman's Lunch

Preparation time: 1 hour
Cooking time 3-3½  hours
Makes approximately 2.3kg  (5lb)

Cooking apples 1.8kg (4lb) peeled, cored and roughly chopped
Onions 900g (2lb) peeled, halved and thickly sliced lengthways
Dry cider 500ml (16fl oz)
Sultanas 175g (6oz)
Seedless raisins 175g (6oz)
Salt 25g (1oz)
Ground ginger 15g (½oz)
Sweet paprika 1 tbsp
Clear honey 225g (8oz)
Soft dark brown sugar 110g (4oz)
Distilled malt vinegar 900ml (1½pints)
Clean jars and acid resistant lids

1 Place the apples and onions in a large, heavy-based preserving pan. Add the cider and cook over a moderate heat for 20 minutes, until the apples and onions start to soften.

2 Add the sultanas, raisins, salt, ginger, paprika, honey and sugar to the pan. Pour in half of the vinegar, stir well and cook for 20 minutes.

3 Stir in the remaining vinegar and bring to the boil, stirring occasionally. Then, reduce the heat and allow the chutney to cook at a gentle bubble until reduced by approximately two-thirds, or until when a spoon drawn through the centre leaves a gap that is slow to close up. Stir the chutney frequently to prevent it burning.

4 Remove the pan from the heat and allow the chutney to cool until cold, then spoon into clean jars. Using a clean skewer, work the skewer backwards and forwards through the chutney to remove any air bubbles.

5 Wipe the tops of the jars clean, and then cover with acid-proof lids. Store in a cool, dark, dry and airy cupboard. Preferably, allow the chutney to mature for 2-3 months before using.

Recipe taken from the Around Britain Dairy Cookbook.

Museums and mini beasts

I simply must rave about my local museum. My son and I had a day off together as my childminder (otherwise known as Mum and Dad) is on holiday.

Isaac and I decided to dodge the rain and try out a new exhibition at the museum. We were there for hours! It was wonderful!

There were so many hands-on exhibits for Isaac – magnifying glasses for examining mini beasts, dressing-up costumes, puzzles, crayons, Velcro pictures and much more. I am so glad I have encouraged museum visits in my recent Family Fun feature for the 2011 Dairy Diary.

Museums are not just for kids of course – there was plenty for me to learn too! Our lunch in the café was very disappointing though, dishes home-made from local ingredients (as you would expect) were sadly lacking. We opted to share a soggy jacket potato and beans followed by a very dry and definitely not home-made scone. Next time I think we will take a picnic and bake our own scones.

Drop in to your local museum next time you have a rainy day and let me know what it’s like (you might want to take these fabulous Wholesome Raisin Scones with you though!)

Wholesome raisin scones

Home-baked scones are a fabulous comfort food – tasty, great texture and surprisingly good for you.

Wholesome Raisin Scones

Wholesome Raisin Scones

Time 45 minutes
Makes 14
Suitable for vegetarians
Suitable for freezing

Raisins 175g (6oz)
Orange juice 3 tbsp
Self-raising flour 225g (8oz)
Wholemeal flour 225g (8oz)
Baking powder 4 tsp
Caster sugar 50g (2oz), plus extra for sprinkling
Butter 150g (5oz)
Buttermilk 284ml carton
Egg 1 large, beaten
Milk for brushing

1 Soak raisins in orange juice in a small bowl for 10–15 minutes. Preheat oven to 425ºC/425ºF/Gas 7.

2 Sift both flours with baking powder into a large bowl, mix in sugar, then rub in butter and make a well in centre.

3 Add soaked raisins (including any remaining liquid), buttermilk and egg to flour and mix to make a soft, slightly sticky dough. Knead lightly on a floured surface, just enough to smooth. Roll out to 2.5cm (1in) thick.

4 Using a floured, 6.5cm (2½ in) plain round cutter, stamp out circles from dough and place on a baking tray. Re-knead and re-roll trimmings and stamp out more scones.

5 Brush scones with a little milk and bake for 12–15 minutes, until well-risen, golden brown and sounding hollow when tapped on base. Sift caster sugar over tops and cool.

A Dairy Diary 2007 recipe.

Ice Cream Sunday

I  enjoyed a gorgeous Sunday lunch at a local pub with some friends (and fidgety children) yesterday. The scrubbed old oak tables and wooden floors looked fabulous, but the highlight was most definitely the home-made ice creams. My personal favourite was apple pie – delicious. A friend of mine sampled the blackcurrant and liquorice ice cream, which none of us were convinced by! Heston Blumenthal is famous for his bacon and egg ice cream of course but I have not come across too many weird and wonderful flavours.
I would love to find out what bizarre flavours there are out there! Perhaps it might be good to stick to the flavours we know we love, such as Rhubarb and Custard Ice Cream from Year Round Dairy Cookbook.

I  enjoyed a gorgeous Sunday lunch at a local pub with some friends (and fidgety children) yesterday.

The scrubbed old oak tables and wooden floors looked fabulous, but the highlight was most definitely the home-made ice creams.

My personal favourite was apple pie – delicious. A friend of mine sampled the blackcurrant and liquorice ice cream, which none of us were convinced by! Heston Blumenthal is famous for his bacon and egg ice cream of course but I have not come across too many weird and wonderful flavours.

I would love to find out what bizarre flavours there are out there! Do you have a favourite? Or a flavour that you loath?

Perhaps it might be good to stick to the flavours we know we love, such as Rhubarb and Custard Ice Cream from Year Round Dairy Cookbook.

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