Tag Archives: Baking

Autumnal offerings

We enjoyed a pleasant walk via local footpaths recently and the children were intrigued by the fattening blackberries on their brambles.
It’s one of the first signs of autumn, which officially begins tomorrow. We will make a special trip – armed with baskets – to pick these delicious fruits when they are fully ripened. With a young toddler, I might need to consult my Dairy Diary stain removal page after our excursion!
It’s wonderful though to be able to enjoy the bounty of our countryside, from picking through to cooking and eating. I might try a bramble jelly this year and I will certainly have a go at the Blackberry and Apple Tartlets recipe – yum. Any more blackberry recipe suggestions gratefully received!
In Britain, in was once considered unlucky to pick blackberries after a certain date, often Michaelmas (29th September), as it was believed the devil would have spat or stamped on them. I don’t think I will be passing that little nugget of folklore on to my son during our forages!
I absolutely adore this season, with crisp sunny walks through rustling leaves, warming autumnal soups, the excitement of bonfire night and fireworks, and the changing colours of the countryside. I can’t wait to try leaf prints with Isaac when they start to fall from the trees – perfect for making cards for those who enjoy autumn Birthdays. It’s times like these when I love living in Britain with our varied weather and beautiful scenery.

We enjoyed a pleasant walk using local footpaths recently and the children were intrigued by the fattening blackberries on their brambles.

It’s one of the first signs of autumn, which officially begins tomorrow. We will make a special trip – armed with baskets – to pick these delicious fruits when they are fully ripened.

With a young toddler, I might need to consult my Dairy Diary stain removal page after our excursion!

Plump blackberries ripe for picking

Plump blackberries ripe for picking

It’s wonderful though to be able to enjoy the bounty of our countryside, from picking through to cooking and eating. I might try a bramble jelly this year and I will certainly have a go at the Blackberry and Apple Tartlets recipe – yum.

In Britain, in was once considered unlucky to pick blackberries after a certain date, often Michaelmas (29th September), as it was believed the devil would have spat or stamped on them. I don’t think I will be passing that little nugget of folklore on to my son during our forages!

I absolutely adore this season, with crisp sunny walks through rustling leaves, warming autumnal soups, the excitement of bonfire night and fireworks, and the changing colours of the countryside. I can’t wait to try leaf prints with Isaac when they start to fall from the trees – perfect for making cards for those who enjoy autumn Birthdays. It’s times like these when I love living in Britain with our varied weather and beautiful scenery.

Do you have a favourite blackberry recipe that you would like to share? Click the “Leave a comment” link below.

Apple and blackberry tartlets

Preparation time 30 minutes
Cooking time 45 minutes
Calories per tartlet 727 Kcal
Fat per tartlet 34g
of which saturated 20.1g
Makes 4 tartlets
Suitable for vegetarians + freezing
For the filling
Bramley cooking apples 500g (1lb 2oz), peeled, cored and sliced
Caster sugar 150g (5oz)
Lemon 1, finely pared zest and juice
Blackberries 150g (5oz), hulled
For the pastry
Plain flour 250g (9oz)
Salt a pinch
Butter 150g (5oz)
Caster sugar 1½ tbsp, plus extra for sifting
Egg 1 large, beaten with 2 tbsp water
1 To make the filling, put the apples in a saucepan, add the sugar, lemon zest and juice and 2 tablespoons of cold water. Cover the pan and cook gently until the apples are softened. Remove from the heat, add the blackberries and set aside to cool.
2 To make the pastry, sift the flour and a pinch of salt into a bowl. Add the butter and rub it into the flour until the mixture resembles fine breadcrumbs, then add the sugar. Finally, add the egg and mix to make a soft dough.
3 Knead the dough on a lightly floured surface and roll it out to 3mm (1⁄8in) thick. Using a 12.5cm (5in) diameter cutter, cut out four rounds from the pastry and set aside.
4 Preheat the oven to 220°C/425°F/Gas 7. Line a four-hole Yorkshire pudding tray with the pastry rounds and fill with the apple and blackberry mixture. Bring the pastry sides in and over the filling.
5 Cover the tartlets loosely with foil and bake in the oven for 35–40 minutes, until golden brown, removing the foil after 20 minutes. Sift a little caster sugar over the tartlets and serve.
Cook’s tip
Open freeze at the end of step 4, then individually wrap in foil and freeze for up to 9 months. Thaw in the fridge overnight and then cook as described.
Shopper’s tip
Bramley cooking apples are best for this recipe. Choose those that are unblemished.
Apple & Blackberry Tartlets

Apple & Blackberry Tartlets

Perfect for an afternoon treat – go on, spoil yourself.

Preparation time 30 minutes
Cooking time  45 minutes
Calories per tartlet  727 Kcal
Fat per tartlet  34g
of which saturated  20.1g
Makes  4 tartlets
Suitable for vegetarians + freezing

For the filling
Bramley cooking apples 500g (1lb 2oz), peeled, cored and sliced
Caster sugar 150g (5oz)
Lemon 1, finely pared zest and juice
Blackberries 150g (5oz), hulled

For the pastry
Plain flour 250g (9oz)
Salt a pinch
Butter 150g (5oz)
Caster sugar 1½ tbsp, plus extra for sifting
Egg 1 large, beaten with 2 tbsp water

1 To make the filling, put the apples in a saucepan, add the sugar, lemon zest and juice and 2 tablespoons of cold water. Cover the pan and cook gently until the apples are softened. Remove from the heat, add the blackberries and set aside to cool.

2 To make the pastry, sift the flour and a pinch of salt into a bowl. Add the butter and rub it into the flour until the mixture resembles fine breadcrumbs, then add the sugar. Finally, add the egg and mix to make a soft dough.

3 Knead the dough on a lightly floured surface and roll it out to 3mm (1⁄8in) thick. Using a 12.5cm (5in) diameter cutter, cut out four rounds from the pastry and set aside.

4 Preheat the oven to 220°C/425°F/Gas 7. Line a four-hole Yorkshire pudding tray with the pastry rounds and fill with the apple and blackberry mixture. Bring the pastry sides in and over the filling.

5 Cover the tartlets loosely with foil and bake in the oven for 35–40 minutes, until golden brown, removing the foil after 20 minutes. Sift a little caster sugar over the tartlets and serve.

Cook’s tip
Open freeze at the end of step 4, then individually wrap in foil and freeze for up to 9 months. Thaw in the fridge overnight and then cook as described.

Shopper’s tip
Bramley cooking apples are best for this recipe. Choose those that are unblemished.

Recipe taken from Clever Cooking for One or Two, Dairy Cookbook.

Luxury Florentines

Luxury florentines
Devine delights. And they look so fabulous too!
Time 50 mins
110 calories per Florentine
6G fat of which 2.8G is saturated
Suitable for vegetarians
Makes 20
Unsalted butter 50g (2oz)
Single cream 90ml (3fl oz)
Soft dark brown sugar 75g (3oz)
Orange 1 small, finely grated zest and 1 tbsp juice
Plain flour 50g (2oz)
Flaked almonds 50g (2oz)
Mixed cut peel 50g (2oz)
Glacé cherries 50g (2oz), quartered
Glacé pineapple or crystallised
stem ginger 25–40g (1–11⁄2oz), chopped
Angelica 25–40g (1–11⁄2oz), chopped
Dark chocolate 100g packet, broken into pieces
1 Preheat oven to 180°C/350°F/Gas 4. Line 3–4 baking trays with baking paper.
2 Put butter, cream, sugar, orange zest and juice into a large saucepan and stir over a moderate heat until melted and smooth.
3 Add flour, almonds, peel, cherries, pineapple and angelica to pan and mix well. Allow mixture to cool a little.
4 Put teaspoonfuls of mixture onto prepared trays, spacing well apart. Bake in batches for 10–12 minutes until spread out thinly and lightly browned.
5 Allow florentines to cool until cold on baking trays. When quite cold, melt chocolate (see page 93) and spread evenly over the smooth underside of each florentine. Allow chocolate to set and store in an airtight
container, interleaved with nonstick foil or baking paper.

Divine delights. And they look so fabulous too! Could you resist one?

Luxury Florentines from the Dairy Diary 2010

Luxury Florentines from the Dairy Diary 2010

Time 50 mins
110 calories per Florentine
6G fat of which 2.8G is saturated
Suitable for vegetarians
Makes 20

Unsalted butter 50g (2oz)
Single cream 90ml (3fl oz)
Soft dark brown sugar 75g (3oz)
Orange 1 small, finely grated zest and 1 tbsp juice
Plain flour 50g (2oz)
Flaked almonds 50g (2oz)
Mixed cut peel 50g (2oz)
Glacé cherries 50g (2oz), quartered
Glacé pineapple or crystallised stem ginger 25–40g (1–11⁄2oz), chopped
Angelica 25–40g (1–11⁄2oz), chopped
Dark chocolate 100g packet, broken into pieces

1 Preheat oven to 180°C/350°F/Gas 4. Line 3–4 baking trays with baking paper.

2 Put butter, cream, sugar, orange zest and juice into a large saucepan and stir over a moderate heat until melted and smooth.

3 Add flour, almonds, peel, cherries, pineapple and angelica to pan and mix well. Allow mixture to cool a little.

4 Put teaspoonfuls of mixture onto prepared trays, spacing well apart. Bake in batches for 10–12 minutes until spread out thinly and lightly browned.

5 Allow florentines to cool until cold on baking trays. When quite cold, melt chocolate (see page 93) and spread evenly over the smooth underside of each florentine. Allow chocolate to set and store in an airtight container, interleaved with nonstick foil or baking paper.

A Dairy Diary 2010 recipe.

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