Tag Archives: arts & crafts

Crafting – Make these Super Cute Mice

Christmas Crafting with the Dairy Diary

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Make these Super Cute Mice

How about trying this gorgeous craft project from the 2014 Dairy Diary? These adorable little mice will delight children and adults alike they’re so cute.

Super Cute Mice

Here’s a great way to brush up your crocheting skills. Use the techniques shown and pattern provided to make a whole nest of these charming little creatures – before you know it, you’ll be hooked!

The chain stitch forms
a chain of linked loops,
which can form a foundation
for the rest of your stitches.

Christmas Crafting InstructionsTechniques

Making a Slip Knot
1 Make a loop of yarn, insert the hook through the loop and hook the long end.
2 Draw the yarn back through the loop using the hook, then gently pull the short end of the yarn to tighten the loop.

Holding the Yarn
To keep the tension even and to control the flow of yarn, loop the short end of the yarn over your left forefinger, and take the yarn coming from the ball loosely around the little finger. Use the middle finger to hold the work. (If you are left handed, hold the yarn with your right hand.)

Making a Chain
1 The chain stitch forms a chain of linked loops, which can form a foundation for the rest of your stitches. Start with your slip knot on the hook then take the yarn over the hook.
2 Draw the hook back through the loop on the hook – you now have 1 chain stitch completed. Repeat to make as many chains as specified. Don’t pull the stitches too tight or they will become tight knots and you won’t be able to insert your hook back in later.

Working in Rounds
Using a marker
To avoid losing your place when working in the round, place a stitch marker or scrap of yarn in the first stitch of each round after completing it, then crochet all the way round to the marker. Move the marker at the start of each round.
Joining each round
1 At the end of the first round, the first and last stitches need to be joined to complete the circle. This is usually done by working a slip stitch into the top of the first stitch.
2 To make the second, and subsequent rounds, the hook must be raised to the height of the new stitches so start each new round with a turning chain. For double crochet, this is one chain.

Double Crochet
1 Insert the hook at the required point in the work, take the yarn over the hook and draw this new loop of yarn through the loop on the hook – there are now 2 loops on the hook.
2 Take the yarn over the hook again and draw this loop through both loops on the hook to complete the double crochet stitch.

Slip Stitch
1 This stitch adds no extra height and is used to join pieces together. Insert the hook into the work, then take the yarn over the hook.
2 Draw this loop through the work and the loop on the hook to make a slip stitch.

Increasing
To increase one stitch in a row or round, simply work 2 stitches into the place where you would normally have worked 1. This can appear anywhere in the row or round. This is written as 2dc into next/every st.

Decreasing
To make a double crochet decrease, 2 stitches are worked together (dc2tog). Insert hook into the next stitch. Take the yarn around the hook and pull back through the stitch. There are 2 loops of yarn on the hook. Insert the hook into the next stitch. Take the yarn around the hook and pull back through the stitch. There are 3 loops of yarn on the hook. Take the yarn over hook and draw through all 3 loops. This leaves 1 loop on the hook.

Method

Body
Make a chain of 2 sts.
Round 1: 6dc in second ch from hook. (6 sts).
Round 2: 2dc into every st. (12 sts).
Round 3: [1dc, 2dc in next st] six times. (18 sts).
Round 4: [2dc, 2dc in next st] six times. (24 sts).
Round 5: [3dc, 2dc in next st] six times. (30 sts).
Round 6: [4dc, 2dc in next st] six times. (36 sts).
Rounds 7–14: 1dc into every st. (36 sts).
Round 15: [4dc, dc2tog] six times. (30 sts).
Round 16: [3dc, dc2tog] six times. (24 sts).
Round 17: 1dc into every st. (24 sts).
Round 18: [2dc, dc2tog] six times. (18 sts).
Round 19: 1dc into every st. (18 sts).
Round 20: [1dc, dc2tog] six times. (12 sts). Insert the eyes and secure. Stuff the body.
Rounds 21–22: 1dc into every st. (12 sts).
Round 23: [Miss 1 st, 1dc] repeat until the opening is closed.

Sl st into next st. Cut yarn and pull through st on hook. Pull tight to fasten off.

Ears (make 2)
Make a chain of 2 sts.
Round 1: 6dc in second ch from hook. (6 sts).
Round 2: 2dc into every st. (12 sts).
Round 3: 1dc into every st. (12 sts). Sl st into next st. Cut yarn and pull through st on hook. Pull tight to fasten off. Sew to body behind the eyes.

Tail
Make a chain of 20 sts, turn, sl st in each ch.
Cut yarn and pull through st on hook. Pull tight to fasten off. Pin and sew to body.

Nose and Whiskers
Cut a small felt triangle for the nose and stitch to the face with white thread at the point of the nose. Using white embroidery thread, stitch 3 whiskers to each side of the nose.

Stuffing
Use soft toy filling, such as fibre fill. Fluff it up with your fingers first so it is filled with air then place into your crochet. Add plenty so the pieces are stuffed firmly. To stuff small pieces, push the filling in with the end of a pencil or a chopstick.

Make these super cute miceNeed to Know

Materials

  • Pink, green and yellow double-knitting yarn; choose other/more colours, if you like.
  • White felt for the noses
  • White embroidery thread
  • 3 x pairs safety eyes
  • Toy filling

Tools

  • 3.5mm crochet hook
  • Embroidery needle

Tension

  • 10 sts and 11 rows to 5cm.

Finished size
6cm high and 9.5cm long. To create mice of different sizes, vary the hook size and yarn weights.

Abbreviations
dc double crochet
ch chain
sl st slip stitch
sts stitches
2dc into next/every st – see increasing
dc2tog – see decreasing

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How to make homemade candles

Homemade candles

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Handmade Teacup Candles

Woops! I’ve caught the crafting bug again. Rather than vegetate in front of the TV every night (which is very tempting after a full day at work and putting three children to bed!) I feel much happier if I create something.

Often, this is done on my knee whilst watching television, but the creative process is very therapeutic. This week, I’ve made two birthday cards and this teacup candle – beautifully vintage.

Here’s how to make it.
But don’t do it on your
knee in front of the TV!

 

What you will need

Homemade-candles-beforeTeacup and saucer

Candle wax 110-125g (4-5oz)

Coloured candle die

Saucepans 2

Pre-waxed wire wick 1 (3½in)

Essential oil a few drops, optional

 

 

Method

  1. Place the candle wax in a small saucepan. Add a tiny mount of the chosen die (a little goes a long way and will look darker in the teacup.)
  2. Put the saucepan over a larger pan of simmering water on the hob. Heat the wax, stirring occasionally.
  3. Remove from the heat as soon as all the wax chips have melted.
  4. Place the wick at the bottom of the cup.
  5. Add a few drops of essential oil to the melted wax, if using, and then pour into the cup.
  6. Leave to cool and then trim the wick to around 2cm (½in) above the wax.

Good luck.

 

Please post photos of your candles on the Dairy Dairy Facebook page.

 

 

Knit & Stitch Collection fringed shawl

Knit & Stitch Fringed Shawl

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A cosy craft project

I felt like all my Christmases had come at once when my Knit & Stitch package landed on the doorstep last week.

Wow, there was copious amounts of gorgeous wool; knitting needles galore; a lovely knitting bag and a cavalcade of exciting new projects to try. I just need to find some time to give them a go!

The beauty of knitting and crochet is that you can do them anywhere, anytime. So, I will be dabbling with the needles whilst snuggled on the sofa watching to latest episode of Wonders of Life (though I don’t know if I can understand both at the same time!)

As you can see from my profile pic, I LOVE scarfs and shawls and so my first project is going to be this gorgeous knitted shawl from issue one.

Knit & Stitch Collection fringed shawl

A soft mohair yarn is used to knit this shawl – using three strands together to produce a thick, but lightweight, fabric. Fringing and tassels trim the outer edge. So chic!

Materials and stitches used: Col. Violette: 6 balls Type: Angel 44% polyamide, 32% acrylic, 24% mohair 25g/275m Stitch Used: stocking stitch Needles: 4.5mm

Size: 93 x 143cm.

Tension: 15 sts x 19 rows in stocking stitch using 4.5mm needles = 10cm square note: Use 3 strands together throughout the shawl. Wind 3 balls together before using to obtain an even finish.

To make: Using 4.5mm needles and 3 strands of yarn together, cast on 3 sts. Work in st st, inc 1 st at each edge (1 st in from edge) on every rs row 68 times. 139 sts.
Cont in st st, dec 1 st at each edge of every rs row 68 times as foll: k1, k2tog, work to last 3 sts, sl 1, k1, psso, k1. Cast off rem 3 sts.

Tassels: To make a tassel of 8cm, wrap yarn around cardboard 33 times (see the instructions, right), attach to one corner of the shawl. Make 3 more tassels and fix to each remaining corner.

Fringe: To make a fringe of 4cm, wrap yarn around cardboard 12 times. On each side of the shawl, between the tassels, tie 30 fringes at approximately 2cm intervals.

Making a tassel

1 Cut a piece of cardboard 2cm longer than the intended tassel. Wind the yarn lengthways 20 to 40 times around the cardboard, depending on the size of the tassel you require.

Make a tassell

2 Thread a length of yarn onto a tapestry needle and slip the needle under the loops along the top edge.

3 Remove the needle and tie the ends firmly, gathering the loops of yarn together. Wind a length
of yarn about 1cm from the tied-off end of the tassel, tie firmly and hide the ends on the inside of the tassel.

4 Finish off by cutting through the yarn loops at the bottom of the tassel, then trim the ends even.

Making a fringe

Make a fringe1 Cut a piece of cardboard 2cm longer than the intended fringe. Wind the yarn around the cardboard, then slip scissors between the yarn and the cardboard and cut through the base of the loops. This will ensure that the strands are all the same length.

2 Insert a crochet hook from wrong side to right side through the knitted edge. Fold a hank of strands in half and place them over the hook, then pull from the wrong side through the fabric to form a loop. Pass the remaining ends of the yarn through the loop and pull firmly. Form the rest of the fringe in the same way, spacing the knots at regular intervals; trim the ends even.

Click the link for more information on the Knit and Stitch Collection

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