Tag Archives: garden birds

Birds to look out for in your garden part 2

The Blue Tit

Spring begins today, thank goodness

 

The beginning of warmer weather, lighter evenings and new flora and fauna.

Watching the high jinks of the irrepressible blue tit around the garden is always a delight.

Here’s the introduction from a fascinating article on the Blue Tit.

Blue Tits on branch

The Blue Tit

Watching the high jinks of the irrepressible blue tit around the garden, on the bird-table or in the woods is always a delight.

As the only resident blue-and-yellow bird in the garden, the blue tit is easy to spot as it flutters from bush to tree, visits the bird-table or flies in and out of a nest-box. Blue tits are fearless, entertaining gymnasts too, whether going topsy- turvy on a bird-feeder or dangling from a wispy twig.

Read the full article

 


FAVOURITE GARDEN BIRDSFor more fascinating facts, info and folklore on our feathered friends, treat yourself to a copy of Favourite Garden Birds

Packed with colour photographs and enchanting drawings from wildlife experts, Favourite Garden Birds will help you to identify the birds that visit your garden each season.

Available now for just £8.99

 


Emily Davenport
Emily Davenport
I post a blog every week featuring food, family and fun. There are lots of useful household tips, crafty ideas, giveaways and delicious recipes that I think you will find irresistible.

Birds to look out for in your garden part 1

The Grey Heron

Did you notice that birdsong seemed louder than usual last lockdown?

I’m not sure why. I’m currently sat in my kitchen during the quiet hour before the children rise and it’s just beginning to get light. The birdsong I can hear is beautiful, so uplifting.

Nature has that affect, listening to or watching birds in your garden seems to have a calming influence.

And despite it being winter, there are still plenty to see. In fact, the absence of foliage means it’s even easier to watch them.

So what birds should you look out for in your garden right now? Watch for robins, starlings, long-tailed tits, wagtails, jackdaws or the lesser well-known, blackcap or even a heron.

Herons look quite comical compared to other birds, and we refer to them as ‘Rupert Annual Birds’, as they look like some of the strange characters from one of my favourite childhood books (who remembers the Rupert Annual?!)

Here’s the introduction from a fascinating article on the Grey Heron. Click the button to read the full text.

Where to look for ehe Grey Heron

The Grey Heron – Birds to look out for in your garden part 1

The grey heron adopts the same frozen stance and look of rapt concentration whether it is hunting in a peaceful backwater or on a lake in the centre of London.

The stately grey heron is a big wading bird which frequents freshwater and saltwater sites all over Britain. In the countryside, herons are timid but in towns and cities they are amazingly unperturbed by all the hustle and bustle.

More often than not, the ghostly grey heron is seen standing perfectly still, feeding in the water or on the banks of rivers, reedy lakes or rushy ponds, muddy estuaries, marshes and dykes.

READ FULL ARTICLE

FAVOURITE GARDEN BIRDS

For more fascinating facts, info and folklore on our feathered friends, treat yourself to a copy of Favourite Garden Birds

Packed with colour photographs and enchanting drawings from wildlife experts, Favourite Garden Birds will help you to identify the birds that visit your garden each season. Available now for just £8.99

BUY NOW

Emily Davenport

Emily Davenport

I post a blog every week featuring food, family and fun. There are lots of useful household tips, crafty ideas, giveaways and delicious recipes that I think you will find irresistible.

5 ways to attract birds to your garden

Garden Bird Feeders

We’re currently trying – and failing – to attract birds to our garden.

One of my children is an avid wildlife fan and was very excited to receive a bird feeder for Christmas.

However, being in a new-build with a garden devoid of plants, we’ve only managed to attract a couple of robins and not much else. Time to consult our trusty Favourite Garden Birds book.

This lovely book is packed full of charming photographs and
illustrations, avian quotes from literature, and fascinating facts
about the birds that could visit your garden.

Its chapter on helping birds should be just what we need to attract feathered friends to our plot.

 


 

And here’s the advice it imparts:

 

1 Provide water

Birds need fresh water more than ever in winter. They must keep their feathers clean if they are to stay warm because dirty feathers do not provide good insulation. If you do not have a pond, provide a bird-bath or wide shallow dish for them to wash in and drink from. Prevent ice from forming by floating a ball on the top, or use hot water to melt the ice each morning.

 

2 Put out food

Some birds are seed-eaters, others insect-eaters and some eat both. Put out a variety of foodstuffs to suit a range of species: bird seed, suet, bacon rind and other cooked meat, live mealworms, grated cheese, apples, pears and bananas.

 

Greenfinch eating peanuts3 In the right place

Some birds prefer to eat from a bird-table, others like pecking at crumbs on the ground, while others like hanging feeders. Make sure that the birds can feed away from prevailing winds and from predators. The best site is out in the open but near to a bush or tree so that they can hide, if needs be. Make sure you clean where they feed on a regular basis.

 

4 Plant for wild winter fare

There are several plants and trees that will give birds food from autumn to spring; just be sure to leave seed-heads on and any windfalls lying beneath the trees. Include some of these in your planting scheme: apple, beech, cotoneaster, hawthorn, holly, ivy, nigella, pear and viburnum.

 

5 Give them a place to nest

If you do not have suitable trees and shrubs in your garden consider a nest box. Fix it facing north so that it won’t become too hot in the summer. You could also put out nesting material, such as wool to give busy parents a head start. Clean thoroughly at the end of each nesting season.

 


 

Favourite Garden BirdsFor MUCH more information on birds, you can purchase Favourite Garden Birds from our online shop for just £7.99.

Click here for more information.

 

#feedthebirds

#gardenbirds

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