Apple and Plum Crumble

Rather than make a traditional crumble mixture using flour, here oats are used as a topping. Oats are an excellent source of soluble fibre, which helps to reduce blood cholesterol levels, and as the energy from them is released slowly, you’ll feel full for longer.
Preparation time 10 minutes
Cooking time 30 minutes
Calories per portion 185 Kcal
Fat per portion 1g
of which saturated 0.2g
Serves 4
Suitable for vegetarians + freezing
Cooking apples 450g (1lb), peeled,
cored and sliced
Plums 450g (1lb), stoned and quartered
Ground cinnamon 1 tsp
Cornflour 1 tbsp
Demerara sugar 3 tbsp
Jumbo oats 3 tbsp
Olive oil spray 2–3 bursts
1 Preheat the oven to 190°C/375°F/Gas 5. Mix together the apple slices, plums, cinnamon, cornflour and 2 tablespoons of the demerara sugar. Tip the mixture into an ovenproof dish. Drizzle with 6 tablespoons of water.
2 Sprinkle the oats over the top and then the sprinkle with the remaining sugar. Spray 2–3 bursts of oil over the top of the oats. Bake in the centre of the oven for 20–30 minutes or until the topping is a light golden colour and the apples feel tender when pierced with a skewer.
Serve with real custard sauce.
Cook’s tip
For a crunchier topping, use jumbo rolled oats or ‘traditional’-style oats, which are larger than normal rolled oats.

Rather than make a traditional crumble mixture using flour, here oats are used as a topping.
Oats are an excellent source of soluble fibre, which helps to reduce blood cholesterol levels, and as the energy from them is released slowly, you’ll feel full for longer.

Apple & Plum Crumble

Apple & Plum Crumble

Preparation time 10 minutes
Cooking time 30 minutes
Calories per portion 185 Kcal
Fat per portion 1g
of which saturated 0.2g
Serves 4
Suitable for vegetarians + freezing

Cooking apples 450g (1lb), peeled, cored and sliced
Plums 450g (1lb), stoned and quartered
Ground cinnamon 1 tsp
Cornflour 1 tbsp
Demerara sugar 3 tbsp
Jumbo oats 3 tbsp
Olive oil spray 2–3 bursts

1 Preheat the oven to 190°C/375°F/Gas 5. Mix together the apple slices, plums, cinnamon, cornflour and 2 tablespoons of the demerara sugar. Tip the mixture into an ovenproof dish. Drizzle with 6 tablespoons of water.

2 Sprinkle the oats over the top and then the sprinkle with the remaining sugar. Spray 2–3 bursts of oil over the top of the oats. Bake in the centre of the oven for 20–30 minutes or until the topping is a light golden colour and the apples feel tender when pierced with a skewer.

Serve with real custard sauce.

Cook’s tip
For a crunchier topping, use jumbo rolled oats or ‘traditional’-style oats, which are larger than normal rolled oats.

Recipe taken from Hearty & Healthy Dairy Cookbook

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Just One Pot flies off the shelf!

We have had very encouraging news regarding Just One Pot Dairy Cookbook this week. The buyer from Dairy Crest tells us it is flying off their shelves – excellent!

Just One Pot, Dairy Cookbook

Just One Pot, Dairy Cookbook

We have been really pleased with the book and its ease-of-use, but you never really know how well it will sell until the milkmen start taking orders. Very encouraging.

We are now putting the final touches to the next cookbook and a brand new gardening book. I am sure these will be just as popular – they are looking stunning. A big thank you to all the team – in particular Aune Butt the author of the gardening book – who have done such as fabulous job. It’s all hands to deck now to meet our print deadlines.

One of my personal favourites from Just One Pot is the excellent Thai Chicken Curry with Noodles. If you would like to try a few more recipes before buying visit the Dairy Diary website and click the sample recipes link.

And don’t forget to let me know what you think of the recipes by clicking the ‘Leave a Comment” link below.

Thai chicken curry with noodles

A fresh and mild curry with a zesty tang – one of my favourite recipes from Just One Pot Dairy Cookbook.

Preparation time 10 minutes
Cooking time 25 minutes
Calories per portion 527 Kcal
Fat per portion 26g
of which saturated 16.4g
Serves 4
Vegetable oil 1 tbsp
Thai curry paste 3 tsp
Skinless, boneless chicken thighs 8, each cut into 4 or 6 square-ish pieces
Coconut milk 400ml can
Aubergine 1, cut into 2.5cm (1in) chunks
Baby sweetcorn 10, halved lengthways
Tenderstem broccoli 110g (4oz), cut into 5cm (2in) lengths
Straight-to-wok noodles 300g packet
Lime 1, grated zest and juice
Thai fish sauce 2 tbsp
Coriander good handful of leaves, left whole or chopped
Thai red chillies 1 or 2, deseeded and finely sliced (optional)
Lime wedges (optional)
Heat the oil in large saucepan. Stir in the curry paste and cook for half a minute. Add the chicken pieces and fry gently until sealed.
Stir in the coconut milk then add the aubergine and baby sweetcorn and bring to the boil. Simmer, with the pan half covered, for 10 minutes.
Add the broccoli stems and cook for another 2 minutes. Then stir in the noodles and put the broccoli heads to steam on top of them. Simmer, uncovered, for 3–5 minutes until the vegetables are just tender.
Season with lime zest and juice and add fish sauce, to taste, and whole or chopped coriander leaves, holding some back to garnish.
Stir gently and serve in warmed bowls. Garnish with red chilli, if you like, and a few more coriander leaves and lime wedges, if using, along with the remaining fish sauce for seasoning to personal taste.
COOK’S TIP
If you like a bit more heat in your Thai curry, add some grated root ginger, garlic and sliced chillies along with the curry paste.
Thia Chicken Curry with Noodles

Thia Chicken Curry with Noodles

Preparation time 10 minutes
Cooking time 25 minutes
Calories per portion 527 Kcal
Fat per portion 26g
of which saturated 16.4g
Serves 4

Vegetable oil 1 tbsp
Thai curry paste 3 tsp
Skinless, boneless chicken thighs 8, each cut into 4 or 6 square-ish pieces
Coconut milk 400ml can
Aubergine 1, cut into 2.5cm (1in) chunks
Baby sweetcorn 10, halved lengthways
Tenderstem broccoli 110g (4oz), cut into 5cm (2in) lengths
Straight-to-wok noodles 300g packet
Lime 1, grated zest and juice
Thai fish sauce 2 tbsp
Coriander good handful of leaves, left whole or chopped
Thai red chillies 1 or 2, deseeded and finely sliced (optional)
Lime wedges (optional)

1 Heat the oil in large saucepan. Stir in the curry paste and cook for half a minute. Add the chicken pieces and fry gently until sealed.

2 Stir in the coconut milk then add the aubergine and baby sweetcorn and bring to the boil. Simmer, with the pan half covered, for 10 minutes.

3 Add the broccoli stems and cook for another 2 minutes. Then stir in the noodles and put the broccoli heads to steam on top of them. Simmer, uncovered, for 3–5 minutes until the vegetables are just tender.

4 Season with lime zest and juice and add fish sauce, to taste, and whole or chopped coriander leaves, holding some back to garnish.

5 Stir gently and serve in warmed bowls. Garnish with red chilli, if you like, and a few more coriander leaves and lime wedges, if using, along with the remaining fish sauce for seasoning to personal taste.

Cook’s tip
If you like a bit more heat in your Thai curry, add some grated root ginger, garlic and sliced chillies along with the curry paste.

Recipe taken from Just One Pot Dairy Cookbook.

A tense day in the Dairy Diary office

Wow! We have had some gorgeous cover designs in today from the illustrators we commissioned a couple of weeks’ ago. All feature flowers and birds, butterflies or dragonflies. I can’t wait for the research groups next week to canvas opinion. I have a definite favourite but I am sure our research groups will think differently, as is often the case! I wish all my work involved this rather than battling with ink cartridges, IT systems, grumpy people and packing parcels!
The reason I am wrestling with ink cartridges (I won’t go into the boring details but grrrr), is that all three of the books for publication next year are almost complete. I am printing out spreads to show to our Editorial Director and to send off for proof reading. It’s a very exciting time – seeing everything coming together – but also a little tense hoping that everything is approved. I am more than thrilled with everything though, so I am quietly confident – watch this space!
As a treat after my especially irritating day I am going to rustle up something delectable for dinner tonight – but it needs to be quick, easy and healthy too. So Fish Provençal from the Hearty & Healthy Dairy Cookbook is perfect. Try it – I’ll think you will love it. Let me know by clicking on the ‘comment’ link below.

Wow! Today we received several gorgeous cover designs for the 2011 Dairy Diary.

We commissioned illustrators a few weeks ago to create designs featuring flowers and birds, butterflies or dragonflies. I can’t wait for the research groups next week to canvas opinion.

I have a definite favourite but I am sure our research groups will think differently, as is often the case! I wish all my work involved this rather than battling with ink cartridges, IT systems, grumpy people and packing parcels!

The reason I am wrestling with ink cartridges (I won’t go into the boring details, but grrrr), is that all three of the books for publication next year are almost complete. I am printing out spreads to show to our Editorial Director and to send off for proof reading. It’s a very exciting time – seeing everything coming together – but also a little tense hoping that everything is approved. I am more than thrilled with everything though, so I am quietly confident – watch this space!

As a treat after my especially irritating day I am going to rustle up something delectable for dinner tonight – but it needs to be quick, easy and healthy too. So Fish Provençal from the Hearty & Healthy Dairy Cookbook is perfect.

Try it – I’ll think you will love it. Let me know by clicking on the ‘Leave a Comment’ link below.

Fish Provençal

Provence is well known for its olives and other Mediterranean foods and here these Provençal flavours are combined to create a delicious fish dish which is superbly easy to make. Make the most of any special offers on white fish – most types will be suitable.
Preparation time 5 minutes
Cooking time 20 minutes
Calories per portion 234 Kcal
Fat per portion 8g
of which saturated 1g
Serves 2
Suitable for freezing
Olive oil spray a few bursts
Onion 1 large, peeled and chopped
Garlic 2 cloves, peeled and crushed
Chopped tomatoes 400g can, drained
Olives 50g (2oz), pitted
Thyme 2 tbsp
Cod, coley or haddock steaks 2 x 150g (5oz)
1 Preheat the grill to medium. Spray a large frying pan with oil and gently fry the onion for around 5 minutes, until soft. Add the garlic, tomatoes, olives and thyme and bring to the boil. Season to taste and simmer for 10 minutes.
2 Meanwhile, grill the fish for 4 minutes on each side. Then place the fish in the frying pan and coat with the sauce. Serve immediately on individual plates with new potatoes and a rocket salad.
Cook’s tip
For really succulent fish, instead of grilling, poach in a pan of gently simmering water for around 5 minutes, turning halfway through if it is not entirely submerged.
Recipe taken from Hearty & Healthy Dairy Cookbook.

Provence is well known for its olives and other Mediterranean foods and here these Provençal flavours are combined to create a delicious fish dish which is superbly easy to make.

Fish Provencal

Fish Provencal

Make the most of any special offers on white fish – most types will be suitable.

Preparation time 5 minutes
Cooking time 20 minutes
Calories per portion 234 Kcal
Fat per portion 8g
of which saturated 1g
Serves 2
Suitable for freezing

Olive oil spray a few bursts
Onion 1 large, peeled and chopped
Garlic 2 cloves, peeled and crushed
Chopped tomatoes 400g can, drained
Olives 50g (2oz), pitted
Thyme 2 tbsp
Cod, coley or haddock steaks 2 x 150g (5oz)

1 Preheat the grill to medium. Spray a large frying pan with oil and gently fry the onion for around 5 minutes, until soft. Add the garlic, tomatoes, olives and thyme and bring to the boil. Season to taste and simmer for 10 minutes.

2 Meanwhile, grill the fish for 4 minutes on each side. Then place the fish in the frying pan and coat with the sauce. Serve immediately on individual plates with new potatoes and a rocket salad.

Cook’s tip
For really succulent fish, instead of grilling, poach in a pan of gently simmering water for around 5 minutes, turning halfway through if it is not entirely submerged.

Recipe taken from Hearty & Healthy Dairy Cookbook.

Autumnal offerings

We enjoyed a pleasant walk via local footpaths recently and the children were intrigued by the fattening blackberries on their brambles.
It’s one of the first signs of autumn, which officially begins tomorrow. We will make a special trip – armed with baskets – to pick these delicious fruits when they are fully ripened. With a young toddler, I might need to consult my Dairy Diary stain removal page after our excursion!
It’s wonderful though to be able to enjoy the bounty of our countryside, from picking through to cooking and eating. I might try a bramble jelly this year and I will certainly have a go at the Blackberry and Apple Tartlets recipe – yum. Any more blackberry recipe suggestions gratefully received!
In Britain, in was once considered unlucky to pick blackberries after a certain date, often Michaelmas (29th September), as it was believed the devil would have spat or stamped on them. I don’t think I will be passing that little nugget of folklore on to my son during our forages!
I absolutely adore this season, with crisp sunny walks through rustling leaves, warming autumnal soups, the excitement of bonfire night and fireworks, and the changing colours of the countryside. I can’t wait to try leaf prints with Isaac when they start to fall from the trees – perfect for making cards for those who enjoy autumn Birthdays. It’s times like these when I love living in Britain with our varied weather and beautiful scenery.

We enjoyed a pleasant walk using local footpaths recently and the children were intrigued by the fattening blackberries on their brambles.

It’s one of the first signs of autumn, which officially begins tomorrow. We will make a special trip – armed with baskets – to pick these delicious fruits when they are fully ripened.

With a young toddler, I might need to consult my Dairy Diary stain removal page after our excursion!

Plump blackberries ripe for picking

Plump blackberries ripe for picking

It’s wonderful though to be able to enjoy the bounty of our countryside, from picking through to cooking and eating. I might try a bramble jelly this year and I will certainly have a go at the Blackberry and Apple Tartlets recipe – yum.

In Britain, in was once considered unlucky to pick blackberries after a certain date, often Michaelmas (29th September), as it was believed the devil would have spat or stamped on them. I don’t think I will be passing that little nugget of folklore on to my son during our forages!

I absolutely adore this season, with crisp sunny walks through rustling leaves, warming autumnal soups, the excitement of bonfire night and fireworks, and the changing colours of the countryside. I can’t wait to try leaf prints with Isaac when they start to fall from the trees – perfect for making cards for those who enjoy autumn Birthdays. It’s times like these when I love living in Britain with our varied weather and beautiful scenery.

Do you have a favourite blackberry recipe that you would like to share? Click the “Leave a comment” link below.

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