Soup

Recipe of the Week: Roast Beetroot & Ginger Soup

Colourful and wonderful, this vibrant soup will cheer your day.

Taken from Cook it Slowly!, our fabulous sell-out cookbook, now back in stock.

Click here for more information.

 

Roast Beetroot & Ginger Soup

 

Roast Beetroot & Ginger Soup

  • Servings: 6-8
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Calories 78 per portion
Fat 3g (0.5g sat) per portion
Suitable for vegetarians
Suitable for freezing

Ingredients

  • Beetroot 4, approx. 680g (1½lb), scrubbed, topped and tailed and cut into thick wedges
  • Red onions 2, peeled and cut into thick wedges
  • Root ginger 25g (1oz), peeled and cut into thick slices
  • Celery 2 sticks, cut into thick chunks
  • Olive oil 2 tbsp
  • Vegetable Stock Pots (or stock cubes) 2
  • Celery salt 1–2 tsp
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • Lime or lemon juice 1–2 tbsp
  • Coconut milk yogurt 125g pot
  • Torn celery leaves to garnish (optional

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 160°C/140°fan/Gas 3. Put the beetroot and onion wedges, ginger and celery in a roasting tin. Add the oil and mix well to coat the vegetables. Cover the tin with foil and roast for 3 hours until the vegetables have softened.
  2. Put half the roasted vegetable mixture into a blender or food processor with one of the Stock Pots (or cubes) and 500ml (18fl oz) boiling water. Purée until smooth, then tip into a large saucepan. Put the rest of the vegetables and cooking juices from the roasting tin into the blender or food processor along with the other Stock Pot and 500ml (18fl oz) boiling water and purée. Add to the first batch.
  3. Stir in the celery salt, pepper and lime or lemon juice to taste. If necessary, reheat gently and adjust the consistency and seasoning to taste. Ladle into warmed bowls then swirl coconut milk yogurt into each one and sprinkle with torn celery leaves, if wished.

Cook’s tips

There’s no need to peel the beetroot. Stir halfway through cooking if you are around but it’s not essential. For a really smooth soup, purée the mixture, then push it through a sieve.

 


 

Cook it Slowly! cookbookRecipe taken from Cook it Slowly!

Prepare quickly, cook slowly and savour every mouthful.

Slowly-cooked meals are easy, fuss-free and delicious with melt-in-the-mouth textures and intense flavours.

For more recipe visit the website…

READ MORE

 

 

#recipeoftheweek

#beetroot

#soup

#tripletested

 

 

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WIN a Morphy Richards 48280 Fastbake Breadmaker

Win a Morphy Richards Breadmaker

Win a Morphy Richards Breadmaker

This breadmaker bakes heavenly-smelling loaves, as well as rolls, pizza dough, cake and even jam!

As it’s compact you’ll only need a small space in your kitchen for this handy machine.

And with a time-delay function, you
can wake up to the aroma of
freshly-baked bread in the morning.

ENTER

But be quick. It’s your last chance to enter today!

 

While your bread’s baking, why not try this wonderful and vibrant soup?

 

Roast Beetroot & Ginger Soup

 

Roast Beetroot & Ginger Soup

  • Servings: 6-8
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Calories 78 per portion
Fat 3g (0.5g sat) per portion
Suitable for vegetarians
Suitable for freezing

Ingredients

  • Beetroot 4, approx. 680g (1½lb), scrubbed, topped and tailed and cut into thick wedges
  • Red onions 2, peeled and cut into thick wedges
  • Root ginger 25g (1oz), peeled and cut into thick slices
  • Celery 2 sticks, cut into thick chunks
  • Olive oil 2 tbsp
  • Vegetable Stock Pots (or stock cubes) 2
  • Celery salt 1–2 tsp
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • Lime or lemon juice 1–2 tbsp
  • Coconut milk yogurt 125g pot
  • Torn celery leaves to garnish (optional

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 160°C/140°fan/Gas 3. Put the beetroot and onion wedges, ginger and celery in a roasting tin. Add the oil and mix well to coat the vegetables. Cover the tin with foil and roast for 3 hours until the vegetables have softened.
  2. Put half the roasted vegetable mixture into a blender or food processor with one of the Stock Pots (or cubes) and 500ml (18fl oz) boiling water. Purée until smooth, then tip into a large saucepan. Put the rest of the vegetables and cooking juices from the roasting tin into the blender or food processor along with the other Stock Pot and 500ml (18fl oz) boiling water and purée. Add to the first batch.
  3. Stir in the celery salt, pepper and lime or lemon juice to taste. If necessary, reheat gently and adjust the consistency and seasoning to taste. Ladle into warmed bowls then swirl coconut milk yogurt into each one and sprinkle with torn celery leaves, if wished.

Cook’s tips

There’s no need to peel the beetroot. Stir halfway through cooking if you are around but it’s not essential. For a really smooth soup, purée the mixture, then push it through a sieve.

 


 

Cook it Slowly! cookbookRecipe taken from Cook it Slowly!

Prepare quickly, cook slowly and savour every mouthful.

Slowly-cooked meals are easy, fuss-free and delicious with melt-in-the-mouth textures and intense flavours.

For more recipe visit the website…

READ MORE

 

 

#win

#competition

#beetroot

#soup

#tripletested

Recipe of the Week: Cauliflower Cheese Soup

 

Cauliflower Cheese Soup

This comforting soup is perfect for tucking in to after a brisk walk in the spring sunshine (or rain!)

Cauliflower Cheese Soup

  • Servings: 2
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Calories 364 per portion
Fat 24g (11g sat) per portion
Suitable for vegetarians

Ingredients

  • Sunflower oil 1 tbsp
  • Onion 1, peeled and chopped
  • Cauliflower 1 head, cut into florets
  • Vegetable stock 450ml (¾ pint)
  • Milk 150ml (¼ pint)
  • Low fat soft cheese 110g (4oz)
  • Cheddar cheese 75g (3oz), grated
  • Dijon mustard 1 tsp
  • Snipped chives to garnish (optional)
  • Walnut or olive bread, warmed to serve (optional)

Instructions

  1. Heat oil in a large pan and cook onion for about 4 minutes until softened.
  2. Add cauliflower, stock and milk to the pan and bring to the boil. Cover and simmer for 8-10 minutes until cauliflower is cooked.
  3. Stir in cheeses and mustard and purée with a stick blender until soup is smooth.
  4. Season to taste and reheat gently until hot. Serve scattered with chives and with warm walnut or olive bread, if you like.

A Dairy Diary recipe

 


 

 

Win a Morphy Richards BreadmakerWin a fantastic Morphy Richards 48280 Fastbake Breadmaker in our prize draw

Bake beautiful bread with less fuss

As its compact you’ll only need a small space in your kitchen for this handy machine.

It bakes heavenly-smelling loaves,
as well as rolls, pizza dough,
cake and even jam!

And with a time-delay function, you can wake up to the aroma of freshly-baked bread in the morning.

Click here to enter

ENTER

 

 


#recipeoftheweek

#comfortfood

#cauliflowercheese

#tripletested

#win

#competition

#breadmaker

#cauliflowercheese

Win a fabulous compact breadmaker!

Win a Morphy Richards Breadmaker

Win a fantastic Morphy Richards 48280 Fastbake Breadmaker in our prize draw

Bake beautiful bread with less fuss

As its compact you’ll only need a small space in your kitchen for this handy machine.

It bakes heavenly-smelling loaves,
as well as rolls, pizza dough,
cake and even jam!

And with a time-delay function, you can wake up to the aroma of freshly-baked bread in the morning.

Click here to enter

ENTER

 


 

And why not make this comforting soup to serve with your homemade bread?

Perfect.

 

Cauliflower Cheese Soup

Cauliflower Cheese Soup

  • Servings: 2
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Calories 364 per portion
Fat 24g (11g sat) per portion
Suitable for vegetarians

Ingredients

  • Sunflower oil 1 tbsp
  • Onion 1, peeled and chopped
  • Cauliflower 1 head, cut into florets
  • Vegetable stock 450ml (¾ pint)
  • Milk 150ml (¼ pint)
  • Low fat soft cheese 110g (4oz)
  • Cheddar cheese 75g (3oz), grated
  • Dijon mustard 1 tsp
  • Snipped chives to garnish (optional)
  • Walnut or olive bread, warmed to serve (optional)

Instructions

  1. Heat oil in a large pan and cook onion for about 4 minutes until softened.
  2. Add cauliflower, stock and milk to the pan and bring to the boil. Cover and simmer for 8-10 minutes until cauliflower is cooked.
  3. Stir in cheeses and mustard and purée with a stick blender until soup is smooth.
  4. Season to taste and reheat gently until hot. Serve scattered with chives and with warm walnut or olive bread, if you like.

A Dairy Diary recipe

 


 

#win

#competition

#breadmaker

#cauliflowercheese

Best Bonfire Night Recipes

Our three favourite Bonfire Night recipes

 

Butternut Squash Velouté

Butternut Squash Velouté

  • Servings: 4
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Calories 362 per portion
Fat 31g (19g sat) per portion
Suitable for vegetarians
Suitable for freezing

Ingredients

  • Butter 50g (2oz)
  • Onions 2, peeled and sliced
  • Garlic 2 cloves, peeled and finely chopped
  • Butternut squash 700g (1lb 9oz), peeled and cubed
  • Vegetable stock 600ml (1 pint)
  • Double cream 150ml pot
  • Freshly grated nutmeg to serve (optional)
  • Toasted sourdough bread to serve (optional)

Instructions

  1. Melt butter in a large pan and add onions and garlic. Cover with a lid and leave to sweat over a low heat for 10 minutes or until softened.
  2. Add squash and stock and bring to the boil. Cover and simmer for 15 minutes or until squash has softened.
  3. Pour in half the cream, season to taste and puree with a stick blender. Serve with a swirl of cream, sprinkled with nutmeg and with sourdough toast, if you like.

 

Gingerbread

Extra Special Gooey Gingerbread

  • Servings: 18 bars
  • Difficulty: medium
  • Print

Calories 157 per portion
Fat 6g (3.5g sat) per portion
Suitable for vegetarians
Suitable for freezing

Ingredients

  • Butter 110g (4oz)
  • Granulated sugar 75g (3oz)
  • Golden syrup 225g (8oz)
  • Marmalade 2 tbsp
  • Self-raising flour 225g (8oz)
  • Ground ginger 2 tsp
  • Bicarbonate of soda ½ tsp
  • Milk 150ml (¼ pint)
  • Eggs 2

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 180°C/350°F/Gas 4. Butter a small roasting tin measuring about 18 x 28 x 4cm (7 x 11 x 1½in) and base line with non-stick baking paper.
  2. Put the butter, sugar, syrup and marmalade into a saucepan and heat, stirring, until the butter has melted and the sugar dissolved. Take the pan off the heat and leave to cool slightly.
  3. Mix the flour, ginger and bicarbonate of soda together in a bowl, then stir into the cooled butter and sugar mixture.
  4. Beat the milk and eggs together, then stir into the ginger mixture. Pour into the prepared tin, level the surface and cook for about 25 minutes until the cake is well risen and golden. The cake is ready when the top springs back when pressed with your fingertips.
  5. Leave the cake to cool in the tin, then take it out of the tin, peel off the paper and cut it into bars.

Cook’s tips
To store, wrap in foil and then keep in an airtight tub or tin.
It’s also delicious as a pudding with a splash of hot custard.

 

Peanut Butter Hot Chocolate

Peanut Butter Hot Chocolate

  • Servings: 2
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Calories 282 per portion
Fat 17g (7.6g sat) per portion
Suitable for vegetarians

Ingredients

  • Milk chocolate 40g (1½oz), broken up
  • Smooth peanut butter 2 tbsp
  • Milk 350ml (12fl oz)
  • Whipped cream 2 tbsp, optional
  • Mini marshmallows and grated chocolate to serve, optional

Instructions

  1. Place chocolate, peanut butter and milk in a pan. Heat gently, whisking, until chocolate has melted and mixture is smooth.
  2. Pour into 2 mugs and top with whipped cream and marshmallows and/or grated chocolate, if using.

 

Recipes taken from the Dairy Diary.

 

Dairy Diary 2018 now available

 

#bonfirenight
#recipes

The origins of Halloween and what to do with all that pumpkin

 Haloween Pumpkin

The origins of Halloween

The origins of Halloween can be traced back to the ancient Celtic festival of Samhain.*

Until 2,000 years ago, the Celts lived across the lands we now know as Britain, Ireland and northern France. Essentially a farming and agricultural people, the Pre-Christian Celtic year was determined by the growing seasons and Samhain marked the end of summer and the harvest and the beginning of the dark cold winter. The festival symbolised the boundary between the world of the living and the world of the dead.

It was believed by the Celts that on the night of 31st October, ghosts of their dead would revisit the mortal world and large bonfires were lit in each village in order to ward off any evil spirits that may also be at large.

The night or evening of Samhain became known
as All-hallows-even then Hallow Eve, still later
Hallowe’en and then of course Halloween.

A special time of the year when many believe that the spirit world can make contact with the physical world, a night when magic is at its most potent.

Throughout Britain, Halloween has traditionally been celebrated by children’s games such as bobbing for apples in containers full of water, telling ghost stories and the carving of faces into hollowed-out vegetables such as swedes and turnips. These faces would usually be illuminated from within by a candle, the lanterns displayed on window sills to ward off any evil spirits. The current use of pumpkins is a relatively modern innovation imported from the United States.

*Halloween by Ben Johnson

Pumpkin carving fun with your children

Halloween carved pumpkinChoose your pumpkin – a large, ripe pumpkin that has smooth, even surfaces and sits comfortably without danger of rolling over is best.

Sketch your pattern on paper to suit the size and shape of your pumpkin. If you’re not artistic, use a stencil or template.

Make the lid by drawing a 125mm (5″) circle on the top. Cut out the lid with the saw/blade at an angle – leaning slightly to the outside – this will stop the lid dropping inside. Remove the lid and clean its base.

The kids can remove the inside – they love this slimy job and can easily remove all the seeds and mushy stuff. Then you can takeover scraping with a spoon or ice-cream scoop. Thin walls make carving easier, but don’t make them too thin or the pumpkin will collapse. Make the base inside flat to accommodate a candle.

Apply your pattern by copying freehand onto the clean, dry pumpkin with a marker/pen/pencil or tape your paper pattern to the pumpkin and mark the design by poking holes through the pattern.

Let’s carve – adults only if you’re using a knife! Carefully begin at the centre of your pattern and work outward – small shapes first. The kids can push out the shapes as you go. Lastly ensure the pumpkin sits stably without danger of rolling.

Light up – place a tea-light in the base. Ensure the candle is level and carefully light it. Always extinguish the candle when leaving the room.

For a carving tool, we recommend a pumpkin saw. If you’re using a knife (small and sharp) carve gently and steadily, making a few gentle strokes for each cut.

 

And what to do with all that pumpkin?

Halloween Pumkin recipes from Dairy Diary

Here are four of our favourite Halloween recipes from the Dairy Diary team:

Halloween Pumpkin Streusel Muffins

Halloween Pumpkin Gratin

Pumpkin & Ginger Risotto

Halloween Cake Pops

 

Yes, we know the Halloween Pop Cakes don’t contain pumpkin, but they are too good to miss out!

Have fun!

 

#halloween

#pumpkin

 

 

 

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