Author Archives for Editor

Walks, castles and coast

Before I start this I think I should point out that Northumberland is a beautiful place, well worth a visit if you like the outdoors. Lots of lovely walks, castle ruins and rugged shoreline.

Last year we spent three nights with friends near Bamburgh, and were fortunate to get some lovely days to explore. So, when offered the chance to go back this year, for a week on our own in a caravan this time, we were quite keen.

Unfortunately for us it was the week of the severe weather warnings in the area. And they were not wrong! 

The first evening we made a plan of action as it was obvious that my summer packing was not going to cut it, we needed more supplies! In the morning we went to the local camping shop to buy myself and my husband some wellies, that made wading to the shower block considerably easier.

Chris admitted that his top of the range waterproof he’d brought along was not doing it’s job, and bought a pack-a-mac. Then we had a clothes stock check, and on our next supermarket visit bought the children more trousers and ourselves more thick socks, to wear in the wellies.

All was not completely lost, we managed a couple of picnics.
One day it was actually dry and quite bright inbetween the clouds rushing along, and we found a sheltered sand dune at Cheswick to sit in to refuel before we got the kites out. Another day visiting Lindisfarne the picnic was a good old-fashioned British eat-in-the-car-admiring-the-coast-view-through-the-windscreen affair.

Instead of picnics what we could have done with was some warming soup, maybe something like the Curried Soup on page 145 of this year’s Dairy Diary? The caravan although well-equipped, was not the place to be trying out creative cookery though.

We cut our losses and packed up a day early to return home. What a relief that was! The sun came out and I managed to dry load after load of muddy, damp washing outside.

Have a warm dry week!

Karen
Dairy Diary Team

Currie Soup with Bacon

Curried Soup with Bacon
A super tasty soup that’s so easy to prepare.

Dairy Diary recipe.

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Curried Soup with Bacon

A super tasty soup that’s so easy to prepare.

Currie Soup with Bacon

Serves 4
Time 35 mins
Calories 171 per portion
Fat 9g of which 4.2g is saturated
Suitable for freezing

Butter 15g (½oz)
Carrot 1, peeled and chopped
Onion 1, peeled and chopped
Potato 175g (6oz), peeled and diced
Smoked streaky bacon 4 rashers, chopped
Korma curry paste 2 tsp
Chicken stock 450ml (¾ pint)
Milk 300ml (½ pint)
Chopped coriander 3tbsp

1 Melt butter in a large pan and gently sauté carrot, onion, potato and bacon for 10 minutes.

2 Stir in curry paste, cook 1 minute then add stock and season with salt and pepper. Bring up to boil, stirring, then cover and simmer for 20 minutes.

3 Purée with a stick blender or in a food processor. Add milk and coriander and reheat.

Dairy Diary recipe.

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The dog days of August

Here we are in the heart of summer, the dog days of August, and it’s dull, raining and chilly. No surprise there, then!

A trip to the open-air theatre in Regent’s Park is coming up, so we fully expect to be enjoying a bit of Gershwin while kitted up in all the wet weather gear.

At least they’ll probably have mulled wine on offer.

The occasion is my birthday, and I’m one of several among family and friends in the next few weeks, so the idea of cake is looming large (not too much cake, though, and not too large!)

One friend with a birthday soon has diabetes so I’m going to have to do some research on the internet to find a suitable recipe, or to see whether the Cider Apple Cake or Marmalade Cake in the new edition of The Dairy Book of Home Cookery (2012) would be OK.

Marmalade Cake from The Dairy Book of Home Cookery, 2012 editionI’m not a great baker of cakes – too much precision needed with the ingredients and following the recipe to the letter. I’m more of a chuck-it-in-and-see sort of cook. But the Marmalade Cake sounds delicious and don’t seem too complicated. I suppose I could push the boat out and make them both.

By the way, the term ‘dog days’ comes from the dog star, Sirius, the brightest star in the sky, part of the constellation Canis Major. It rises and sets with the sun during the summer and the ancients believed the two combined to create especially hot and steamy days. So what’s gone wrong?!

Have good weekends.

Marion
Dairy Diary Team

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Marmalade Cake

Simple to make and delicious on a summer afternoon.

Marmalade Cake from The Dairy Book of Home Cookery, 2012 editionServes 6–8
Preparation 20 mins
Cooking 1¼ hrs
Per portion 264 kcals,
13g fat (7.7g saturated)
Suitable for freezing
Suitable for vegetarians

225g (8oz) plain flour
Pinch of salt
1 tbsp baking powder
110g (4oz) butter
50g (2oz) caster sugar
½ tsp grated orange rind
2 eggs, beaten
3 tbsp orange marmalade
2–3 tbsp milk

1 Grease and line an 18cm (7in) round cake tin or a 450g (1lb) loaf tin.

2 Sift flour, salt and baking powder into a large bowl. Rub in butter until mixture resembles fine breadcrumbs.

3 Add sugar and orange rind. Mix to a fairly soft batter with eggs, marmalade and milk. Transfer to tin.

4 Bake at 180°C (350°F) Mark 4 for 1–1¼ hours or until a wooden cocktail stick, inserted into centre, comes out clean. Leave in tin for 5 minutes.

5 Turn out on to a wire cooling rack. Peel off paper. Store cake in an airtight container when cold.

Recipe taken from The Dairy Book of Home Cookery | 2012 edition

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Time for action

When you have been with your partner for some time, as I have, you get to a point where sometimes you say things a little too bluntly.

Just last week my darling husband looked me up and down and declared I was the fattest he’d ever known me. Charming. I had felt it too of course, but Chris underlined it.

Admittedly the trousers are feeling a little snug and the tummy is creating the ‘muffin top’ that all women try to avoid, but I refuse to go up a size. I think my recent lack of any fat-burning exercise since missing out on training for the ‘Race for Life’ this year and our over-productive blackberry bush have helped me reach this point.

Fruit Crumble from The Dairy Book of Home Cookery | 2012 editionThere have been quite a few home-made crumbles and pies this past few weeks, including the delicious Fruit Crumble in the new Dairy Book of Home Cookery.

 

Time for action! So, I have squeezed myself back into my jogging pants and been for two runs this week, and it didn’t feel bad.

On Tuesday night when I went out I had decided to challenge myself to run, no walking, all the way back home, about 2km. Halfway along the gently downhill road a progression of Hell’s Angels bikers started deliberately slowing down as they neared me. ‘Here we go’, I thought, ‘I’m in for some abuse…’ as the leader stopped I couldn’t avoid taking my headphones out and coming to a standstill.

‘Do you know where Loxley is?’ he asked. Phew! Just directions, and directions I knew the answer to at that. It was such a relief. As I plugged back in and got my tired legs moving again they all cordially gave me a nod of thanks as they rumbled away.

Chris loved this story when I regaled it to him, as we both sat devouring our blackberry crumbles… well, it was the last of the season so I could hardly refuse!

Keep fit!

Karen Perry
Dairy Diary Team

P.s. Fruit Crumble is a favourite with all the family. Serve with real custard sauce for the ultimate comforting dessert.

 

 

 

 

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Fruit Crumble with variations

Fruit Crumble from The Dairy Book of Home Cookery | 2012 edition

A favourite with all the family. Served with real custard a good crumble is a wonderful thing.

Serves 6
Preparation 25 mins
Cooking 1 hr
Per portion 307 kcals, 11g fat (6.6g saturated)
Suitable for freezing
Suitable for vegetarians

900g (2lb) cooking apples, rhubarb, gooseberries, damsons, plums, blackberries or red or blackcurrants
75–110g (3–4oz) granulated sugar, depending on sharpness of fruit
175g (6oz) plain flour
75g (3oz) butter
50g (2oz) caster sugar

1 Prepare fruit, slicing any large pieces. Put into a 1.25 litre (2 pint) ovenproof dish in layers with granulated sugar.

2 Cover with foil and bake at 190°C (375°F) Mark 5 for 15 minutes.

3 Sift flour into a bowl. Rub butter into flour until mixture resembles fine breadcrumbs. Stir in caster sugar.

4 Sprinkle crumble evenly over fruit. Press down lightly, then smooth top with a knife.

5 Reduce oven to 180°C (350°F) Mark 4 and bake for a further 45 minutes or until top is light brown.

Variations

Oaty Fruit Crumble
Follow recipe and method for Fruit Crumble. For the crumble topping mix together wholemeal flour, brown sugar and 25g (1oz) porridge oats with the butter.

Ginger Fruit Crumble 
Follow recipe and method for Fruit Crumble. For the crumble topping use demerara
sugar instead of caster sugar and add 1 tsp ground ginger.

Crispy Lemon Crumble
Follow recipe and method for Fruit Crumble. Add grated rind of 1 lemon and 2 tbsp crushed cornflakes to crumble topping.

Recipe taken from The Dairy Book 0f Home Cookery | 2012 edition

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