Daily Archives: 28 November 2011

2012 Olympic Games

As London is hosting the Olympic Games next year, we have a feature on the history of the Games in 2012 Dairy Diary.

It is full of interesting facts, such as:

  • Britain is the only country to have won a gold medal in every one of the modern summer Olympics
  • in 1908 Britain won 56 golds
  • art competitions used to be part of the games in the early part of the 20th century!

In ancient Greece, a flame, ignited by the sun, was kept burning until the Games closed, and in 1928 the practice of keeping a flame alight for the duration of the Games was adopted by the modern Olympics.

A relay of runners bringing it to the host city was first introduced for the 1936 Games, held in Berlin.

As hosts we are all lucky enough to have the chance to see the flame pass.

There are 1,018 cities, towns and villages on the route of the Olympic Torch Relay next year. Between 18 May and 27 July, the Olympic Flame will come to within just 10 miles of 95% of the population of the UK. The Torch Relay will include some breathtaking spectacles and unusual modes of transport.

The world-famous telescope at Jodrell Bank, a steamer across Lake Windermere and the Manx Electric Railway all feature in the plans. Well worth watching!

For more information visit http://www.london2012.com/olympic-torch-relay

 

St Andrew’s Day

We have so much to celebrate! It’s St Andrew’s Day on Wednesday. Take the opportunity to make this delicious soup, which comes from the fishing village of Cullen, in Morayshire, Scotland.

 

Cullen SkinkCullen Skink
The name of this rich, tasty soup comes
from the fishing village of Cullen, in Morayshire.

Recipe taken from Around Britain Dairy Cookbook.

 

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Cullen Skink

Cullen Skink

The name of this rich, tasty soup comes from the fishing village of Cullen, in Morayshire.

Preparation time – 30 minutes
Cooking time – 40 minutes
Calories per portion – 411 Kcal
Fat per portion – 12g of which saturated – 6.9g
Serves – 4

Finnan haddock 1 (about 900g/2lb) or 500g (1lb 2oz) un-dyed smoked haddock fillet
Onion 1 large, skinned and thinly sliced
Milk 600ml (1 pint)
Potatoes suitable for mashing (such as King Edwards) 680g (11⁄2lb), peeled and thickly sliced
Leeks 2, trimmed, thinly sliced and washed
Butter 40g (11⁄2oz), cut into small pieces
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
Mace to garnish
Parsley sprigs, to garnish

1 Place the haddock in a large saucepan, add the onion, milk and 600ml (1 pint) of water. Bring to the boil, then reduce the heat, cover and cook gently for 10 minutes, or until the flesh flakes easily.

2 While the fish is cooking, place the potatoes in another large saucepan, cover with water, add 1⁄2 tsp of salt and bring to the boil. Then reduce the heat, partially cover the pan and cook until tender. Drain the cooked potatoes, and then mash them well with a potato masher.

3 Place a large colander over a bowl. Pour the haddock into the colander and leave it to drain well, and until cool enough to handle. Reserve the cooking liquid.

4 Remove and discard skin and bones from the fish, then flake the flesh. Reserve the onion.

5 Pour the fish liquid back into a clean pan, then using a balloon or hand whisk, gradually whisk in the mashed potatoes. Add the leeks and bring back to the boil, then reduce the heat, cover and cook gently for 10–15 minutes until the leeks are tender.

6 Gradually stir the butter into the soup, season to taste with salt and pepper, and then add the flaked fish and reserved onion. Cook gently for 5 minutes, or until the haddock is thoroughly reheated, taking care not to overheat as the fish will become tough.

7 Serve the soup in warm bowls, sprinkled with mace, black pepper and parsley leaves, and accompanied with warm crusty bread.

Cook’s tip
For a richer flavoured soup, use fresh fish stock instead of water

Recipe taken from Around Britain Dairy Cookbook.

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