Recipe of the Week: Crêpes with Brandy Marmalade Sauce

Crêpes with Brandy Marmalade Sauce & win a fabulous Crêpe Maker!

One of my favourite memories is eating a hot Parisian crêpe smothered in Nutella whilst watching the Eiffel Tower ‘twinkle’.

I can’t relive that every day, but I can endeavour to cook some amazing crêpes.

Here’s how……

Crêpes with Brandy Marmalade Sauce

Crêpes with Brandy Marmalade Sauce

  • Servings: 2
  • Time: 40 mins
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Calories 514 per portion
Fat 20g (3g sat) per portion
Suitable for vegetarians

Ingredients

  • Plain flour 50g (2oz)
  • Caster sugar 25g (1oz)
  • Egg 1
  • Semi-skimmed milk 60ml (2fl oz)
  • Sunflower oil 3–4 tbsp
  • Marmalade 3 tbsp
  • Brandy 2 tbsp

Instructions

  1. Put the flour, sugar and egg into a bowl and mix. Then mix the milk with 60ml (2fl oz) of water in a jug and gradually whisk it into the sweetened flour and egg, together with 2 tablespoons oil, to make a smooth batter.
  2. Put the marmalade in a small saucepan with the brandy. Bring to the boil, stirring, until the marmalade melts, then boil for a few minutes to make a syrup. Remove the pan from the heat and leave to stand.
  3. Pour a little oil into the base of a small non-stick frying pan. When hot, pour away the excess oil. Add 2 tablespoons of the crêpe mixture to the pan and tilt the pan until the base is covered. Cook for 1–2 minutes until the base is lightly browned.
  4. Turn the crêpe over with a knife and cook the other side. Slide it from the pan and keep warm. Repeat until all the batter has been used.
  5. Arrange the crêpes on warmed plates and spoon the marmalade sauce over them. Serve immediately.

Cook’s tips
If you don’t have brandy, simply add 2 tbsp water instead.
You could serve the crêpes with a scoop of vanilla ice cream if you like.


.

Win a Breville Crêpe Maker

Win a Breville Crépe Maker

Make crepes, pancakes and more!

Everyone has their favourite don’t they? Lemon and sugar. Banana and chocolate. Ham and cheese. But that’s just pancakes and crepes. The Breville® Crêpe Maker is for those and so much more. Indulge in quirky quesadillas, funky fajitas and brilliant blinis too.

Included with the Breville® Crepe Maker you’ll find a t-stick spreading tool to spread your mixture over the crepe makers hot plate and a handy recipe guide full of sweet and savoury recipes.

ENTER

 


 

#competition

#crépes

#pancakes

Just For One Or Two cookbook back in stock plus a special Valentine’s Day menu

Hot off the press!
Our sell-out cookbook is now back in stock!

Just For One Or Two cookbookJust for One or Two is one of the fastest selling cookbooks we have ever published. Selling out well before Christmas, it proved to be a real favourite with our customers.

After many requests we have reprinted, and it’s now back in stock and available to order online here <link> or by calling 01425 463390.

Not only is it perfect for single and couples,
it’s also a great ‘date night’ cookbook for families
who have young children and find it difficult to
escape for a meal out.

So why not make every day delicious with Just for One or Two?

READ MORE

 

A very special (but super-easy) Valentine’s Day menu.

For romantics out there here’s a gorgeous menu of recipes from the book to cook for (or with) your other half on Valentine’s Day.

Mushrooms with Goat’s Cheese

Beef Steak with Peppercorn Sauce & Potato Wedges

Crêpes with Brandy Marmalade Sauce

Have fun!

And don’t forget to look out for our competition to win a fabulous Breville Crêpe Maker. Coming very soon.


 

Mushrooms with Goat's Cheese

Mushrooms with Goat’s Cheese

  • Servings: 2
  • Time: 40 mins
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Calories 185 per portion
Fat 12g (7g sat) per portion
Suitable for vegetarians

Ingredients

  • Large flat mushroom 2, wiped
  • Shallot 2, peeled and finely chopped
  • Fresh white breadcrumbs 30g (½oz)
  • Butter 30g (½oz), melted
  • Chopped thyme 2 tsp, plus leaves to garnish
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • Goat’s cheese 50g round slice
  • Salad leaves to serve (optional)

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 200°C/400°F/Gas 6. Remove the stalks from the mushrooms. Chop the stalks finely and then mix with the shallots, breadcrumbs, melted butter, thyme and seasoning.
  2. Pack the mixture into the mushrooms. Place on a baking sheet and cook in the centre of the oven for 15 minutes.
  3. Place the cheese on the mushrooms and sprinkle with a few extra thyme leaves. Return to the oven for a further 10–15 minutes, or until the cheese starts to melt and turn golden. Remove from the oven, sprinkle with black pepper and serve immediately with a few salad leaves if liked.

Cook’s tips

Mushrooms don’t need peeling; just wipe with a clean, damp cloth or small mushroom brush to remove any dirt.

This recipe is ideal fo using up any leftover cheese; instead of goat’s cheese use any sliced soft cheese or grated hard cheese of your choice.

You could use a pinch of dried thyme instead of fresh.

You could also add a little lemon zest to the stuffing mixture if you like.

 


 

Beef Steak with Peppercorn Sauce & Potato Wedges

Beef Steak with Peppercorn Sauce & Potato Wedges

  • Servings: 2
  • Time: 75 mins
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Calories 747 per portion
Fat 62g (30g sat) per portion

Ingredients

  • Olive oil 2 tbsp plus 3 tsp
  • Potatoes 2, peeled and cut into wedges
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • Onion 1 small, peeled and finely chopped
  • Garlic 1 clove, peeled and finely chopped
  • Whole black peppercorns 2 tsp, lightly crushed
  • Beef stock 150ml (¼ pint)
  • Double cream 150ml pot
  • Beef rump steaks 2
  • Mixed salad 50g packet, to serve

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 200°C/400°F/Gas 6. Pour 2 tablespoons oil into a roasting tin and place in the oven to heat up.
  2. Meanwhile, put the potatoes in a pan of water, bring to the boil and simmer for 2 minutes. Drain well and rough up the edges by shaking in the pan.
  3. Remove the roasting tin from the oven and carefully add the wedges. Season with salt and pepper. Using a long handled spoon, coat the potato wedges in the oil and spread out in the tin.
  4. Return the tin to the oven and cook for 45–50 minutes until crisp, turning after 20 minutes.
  5. To make the sauce, heat 2 teaspoons oil in a small heavy-based frying pan over a medium heat. Add the onion and garlic and cook for about 5 minutes until softened, stirring frequently.
  6. Add the peppercorns and 4 tablespoons of the beef stock. Simmer until almost all the liquid has evaporated, then add the leftover stock with the cream and bring to the boil. Simmer until reduced and thickened, stirring occasionally. Season to taste.
  7. For the steaks, preheat a griddle until hot. Brush 1 teaspoon oil onto both sides of the steaks, then cook according to taste. Usually, for rare cook for 2 minutes on each side, for medium cook for 3–4 minutes on each side, and for well done cook for 4–6 minutes on each side. Leave to rest for a few minutes.
  8. Serve the steaks with the potato wedges, salad and the peppercorn sauce.

 


 

Crêpes with Brandy Marmalade Sauce

Crêpes with Brandy Marmalade Sauce

  • Servings: 2
  • Time: 40 mins
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Calories 514 per portion
Fat 20g (3g sat) per portion
Suitable for vegetarians

Ingredients

  • Plain flour 50g (2oz)
  • Caster sugar 25g (1oz)
  • Egg 1
  • Semi-skimmed milk 60ml (2fl oz)
  • Sunflower oil 3–4 tbsp
  • Marmalade 3 tbsp
  • Brandy 2 tbsp

Instructions

  1. Put the flour, sugar and egg into a bowl and mix. Then mix the milk with 60ml (2fl oz) of water in a jug and gradually whisk it into the sweetened flour and egg, together with 2 tablespoons oil, to make a smooth batter.
  2. Put the marmalade in a small saucepan with the brandy. Bring to the boil, stirring, until the marmalade melts, then boil for a few minutes to make a syrup. Remove the pan from the heat and leave to stand.
  3. Pour a little oil into the base of a small non-stick frying pan. When hot, pour away the excess oil. Add 2 tablespoons of the crêpe mixture to the pan and tilt the pan until the base is covered. Cook for 1–2 minutes until the base is lightly browned.
  4. Turn the crêpe over with a knife and cook the other side. Slide it from the pan and keep warm. Repeat until all the batter has been used.
  5. Arrange the crêpes on warmed plates and spoon the marmalade sauce over them. Serve immediately.

Cook’s tips
If you don’t have brandy, simply add 2 tbsp water instead.
You could serve the crêpes with a scoop of vanilla ice cream if you like.


 

#justforoneortwo

#recipesfortwo

#tripletested

#valentinesday

Breakfast Week

Scramble Eggs with Smoked Salmon

Celebrate Breakfast Week with this decadent breakfast from the Take a Box of Eggs cookbook.

Scrambled Eggs with Smoked Salmon

  • Servings: 2
  • Time: 10 mins
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Calories ?766 per portion
Fat 55g (25.2g sat) per portion

Ingredients

  • Butter 75g (3oz), softened
  • Tomato purée 2 tsp
  • Chopped dill 2 tbsp, plus a few fronds to garnish
  • Capers 2–3 tbsp, well drained and roughly chopped
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • Mediterranean-style bread with olives 4 slices, approximately 2cm (¾in) thick, cut diagonally
  • Eggs 5 large, beaten
  • Smoked salmon slices 100g packet, cut into thin strips
  • Beefsteak tomato 1, deseeded and diced, to garnish (optional)

Instructions

  1. Put 50g (2oz) of the butter into a small bowl, then add the tomato purée, chopped dill and capers. Season with black pepper, then mix well together and set aside.
  2. Toast the bread and keep warm.
  3. Melt the remaining butter in a small saucepan (preferably non-stick), add the eggs and half of the salmon strips. Then cook over a moderate heat, stirring continuously, until the eggs are softly scrambled – taking care not to overcook, as they will become dry.
  4. Spread the toasted bread with the tomato butter and put onto two serving plates. Spoon the scrambled eggs on top, garnish with the remaining strips of salmon, dill and the chopped tomato, and serve immediately.

Cook’s Tip
For quick assembly, prepare all the ingredients before starting to cook and toast the bread while scrambling the eggs.

 


 

Take a Box of EggsBuy the brilliant
Take a Box of Eggs
cookbook at just £7.49.

Buy Dairy Diary 2016

 

 

 

#breakfastweek
#tripletestedrecipes
#eggs

 

 

 

 

Create a gorgeous garden by planting a tree

How to plant a tree

Create a gorgeous garden by planting a tree – Dairy Diary shows you how

We might not be spending much time in the garden at the moment, but the long dark evenings give us a great opportunity to plan for the spring and summer.

Use Pinterest to create inspiring moodboards with images of gardens and plants that you love. You could even plan to plant a show-stopping tree.

In the 2016 Dairy Diary we show you how to choose the perfect spot and the ideal specimen.

Dairy Diary 2016The Dairy Diary is still
available to buy here
or by calling 01425 463390.

 

 


 

Grow your own tree

How to plant a treeTrees, beautiful and ever-changing, bring a reassuring sense of continuity – plant a tree and in the normal course of events it will be there for generations to come.

Besides this, the bare fact is that trees play a vital role in all our lives. We breathe in oxygen and breathe out carbon dioxide; trees do the opposite, although in fact they store carbon dioxide rather than releasing this ‘greenhouse gas’ into the atmosphere. The leaves absorb various pollutants including nitrous oxides, sulphur dioxide and carbon monoxide.

So trees not only produce oxygen but help clean the air, too, and they help to decontaminate the soil by absorbing noxious chemicals, either storing them or changing them into a less harmful state. These are the fundamental reasons why it is so important to maintain woodlands and parks, especially in urban areas.

“We breathe in oxygen
and breathe out carbon
dioxide; trees do the opposite”

There’s more: trees prevent soil erosion, slow down water run-off (particularly important in storm or flood conditions), act as windbreaks, deaden noise and give shade and shelter. They provide natural habitats for birds, insects and other animals, support other plant life and offer a terrific harvest in the form of timber, fruit and nuts, not to mention soil-enriching compost from leaf fall. Life would be poorer – not to say impossible – without trees, so the more of them the better.

At least two charities are on the case. The Woodland Trust organises tree planting, including acres of new woodland to commemorate the First World War, as does the Tree Council, which also runs National Tree Week as an annual autumn event (check websites for details). The National Trust is another great defender and planter of trees. A one-off On a less ambitious scale, you could consider cultivating your own tree. Just one would be a great asset to the garden whether deciduous or evergreen.

Think about whether you want one that produces lovely flowers in the spring, such as a magnolia, or has colourful foliage in the autumn, such as a maple. A fruit tree will provide you with a succulent harvest or perhaps you prefer a tree that’s purely decorative, such an ornamental cherry, paperbark maple or a weeping silver pear. Consider how tall your tree is likely to grow and how much it will spread. When deciding where to put it, and whether you want it to be a focal point in the garden, take into account how the shade cast will affect the house and the rest of the garden, and indeed your neighbour’s house and garden.

Soil type is critical. Different species of tree prefer different conditions, so don’t skimp on your research. Get the match wrong and your long-term beauty is likely to turn into a short-term flop. You can grow a small tree in a container, and thus control soil type, but position the container carefully because, once your tree starts growing, the pot may be difficult to move.

“Consider how tall your
tree is likely to grow and
how much it will spread”

Planting a Tree Autumn and winter are the recommended times to plant a tree, whether bare-rooted or container grown.

About a month beforehand, prepare the site by loosening the soil and digging in some organic matter or fertiliser. in a wide area (about 3m/10ft). When it comes to planting, leave the tree in a bucket of water for an hour, still in its pot, if that’s how it came.

Dig the hole as deep as the roots and about three times as wide. The base of the trunk should be a fraction above the soil when the hole is backfilled. Backfilling is a job for two. Ask someone to hold the tree upright and make sure soil fills in around the roots, leaving no air pockets – best done with your hands.

Firm the soil, not too hard. No need for more fertiliser, which may damage fragile roots, but do mulch with well-rotted compost, not right up to the stem. Support the sapling with a stake or two, secured with tree ties. Remember to loosen them as the tree grows.

The young tree will need plenty of watering in its first few years (even if it rains a lot!) and it’s best to keep the area around it clear of other plants. Mulching is good but, again, not right up to the trunk because if this is constantly damp, the bark may rot.

Practicalities

It can be worrying if you have a tree near the house, but usually it’s not a problem – as far away from the house as it’s tall is a good rule of thumb, and keep it neat and well pruned. It may be a good idea to have it surveyed from time to time, so that if any problems do arise, they can be nipped in the bud. Serious subsidence or structural damage to a building are rarely the fault of a tree, although it may add to the problem; and subsidence may be a risk on clay in prolonged dry weather, since the tree taking water from the soil may cause shrinkage.

Generally, tree roots don’t block drains – only if the drain is already damaged, allowing the roots a way in. A tree is the responsibility of the landowner, and so you may be liable for any damage caused by branches breaking off in the wind, for example. Check your insurance to make sure you’re covered, and for specific conditions that may apply to your property. And before doing anything drastic to a tree, check with the Local Authority to see whether it’s subject to a Tree Preservation Order (when various restrictions apply).

 


 

Websites

forestry.gov.uk
nationaltrust.org.uk
rhs.org.uk
treecouncil.org.uk
woodlandtrust.org.uk

 

 

Recipe of the Week: Cheddar & Chorizo Scones

Cheddar & Chorizo Scones

  • Servings: 8
  • Time: 30 mins
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Serve these amazing scones warm with real butter for a comforting winter treat.

Calories 151 per portion
Fat 7.3g (4.3g sat) per portion
Suitable for freezing

Ingredients

  • Self-raising flour 225g (8oz)
  • Butter 50g (2oz)
  • Cheddar cheese 50g (2oz), grated
  • Chorizo 40g (1½oz), chopped
  • Milk 150ml (¼ pint) plus extra to glaze

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 230°C(210°fan)/450°F/Gas 8. Line a baking tray with baking paper.
  2. Sift flour into a large bowl, then rub in butter until it resembles fine breadcrumbs.
  3. Stir cheese and chorizo into flour. Then add milk and mix to a soft but not sticky dough.
  4. Turn onto a lightly floured surface and knead until smooth.
  5. Roll out to 2cm (¾in) thick and cut out rounds with a 7.5cm (3in) circular cutter. Repeat until dough is used up.
  6. Place on baking sheet and brush tops with milk. Bake for 12-15 minutes until well risen and golden. Cool slightly on a wire rack. Serve warm or cold.

Read Cheddar & Chorizo Scones on the Dairy Diary website

 

A Dairy Diary recipe.

Bake Box – the treat that keeps on giving. And win, win, win!

 

The Bake Box

It’s easy to feel flat at this time of year when the excitement of Christmas is long gone and the days are short.

How about treating yourself to regular surprise? 

In these modern days of email and social media (remember letter writing?) it’s rare to receive something unexpected through the post. With the fabulous new Bake Box you get every an exciting box of goodies every couple of months.

Bake Box is the brand new subscription box designed for blossoming bakers to build up a brilliant repertoire of new skills as well as a collection of great baking equipment.

Bake Box is the first of its kind available in the UK and
includes recipe cards for 6 stunning bakes and the tools
needed to transform any cake into a showstopper.

The contents of each box are kept secret – so each package is a surprise!

The Bake Box

With a subscription to the Bake Box you automatically receive complimentary access to the gorgeous Bake Club site. Here you can check out masterclass videos, enjoy fortnightly bonus recipes, expand your knowledge of ingredients and techniques and show off to your fellow bakers!

Bake Box won’t break the bank either. At £14.99 per box it’s great value for money as each box contains at least £40 worth of equipment. Wow!

Sign up here now. I already have!

THE BAKE BOX

 

And for 3 VERY lucky people we have a fabulous Bake Box to give away.

To be in with a chance of winning  enter now.

ENTER

 

#treatyourself #bakeclublive #win

 

 

 

Recipe of the Week | Turmeric Pickled Cauliflower

Turmeric Pickled Cauliflower

Try this fabulous pickle as a side dish with your favourite meat or cheese or as a guilt-free snack.

Turmeric Pickled Cauliflower

  • Servings: 2-3 jars
  • Time: 15 mins plus cooling
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Calories 34 per portion
Fat 0.4g (0.1g sat) per portion
Suitable for vegetarians

Ingredients

  • White/Chinese rice wine vinegar 300ml (½ pint)
  • Caster sugar 2 tbsp
  • Salt 1 tbsp
  • Turmeric 1 tsp
  • Mustard seeds 1 tsp
  • Crushed dried chillies 1 tsp
  • Cauliflower 1 small, broken into florets
  • Clean jars 1 large or 2 small

Instructions

  1. Pour vinegar into a saucepan with 200ml (7fl oz) water. Add sugar and salt and bring up to boil. Stir until sugar has dissolved.
  2. Add turmeric, mustard seeds and crushed chillies to liquid.
  3. Pack cauliflower into clean jars, pour in liquid and leave to cool. Cover and refrigerate for up to 8 weeks.

A Dairy Diary recipe.

 

#pickles

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