Choose your favourite cover and you could win a Dairy Diary 2016

Dairy Diary 2017 Covers research

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We need your help!

My task for this week is to choose a front cover for the Dairy Diary 2017.

I would love your help.
The more the merrier!

The survey has just three questions and will only take one minute or less to complete.

One lucky person will receive a copy of the Dairy Diary 2016!

 

Help us to choose the cover for Dairy Diary 2017

 

 

 

Thank you.

Chicken Satay with Indonesian-style Salad

Us Brits love a good barbecue don’t we?

As soon as the sun peeps from behind the clouds we dash off for supplies and the scent of burning charcoal drifts across the land.  

This relaxed, informal way of eating is a great way to unwind and enjoy the company of good friends, but it needn’t be boring beef burgers – jazz up your barbie with some Dairy Diary favourites.

Try this Chicken Satay recipe and then click over to Top Six Barbecue Favourites. at http://dairydiarychat.co.uk/2014/07/21/top-five-barbecue-favourites/

Chicken Satay with Indonesian-style Salad

  • Servings: 4
  • Time: 25 mins
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Calories 325 per portion
Fat 13.6g (7.5g sat) per portion

Ingredients

  • Skinless chicken breasts 4 large, cut into strips about 1cm (½in) thick
  • Peanut or satay cooking sauce 150-200g (5-7oz)
  • Coconut milk 175ml (6fl oz)
  • Lime 1, grated zest and juice of ½ and the rest cut into wedges
  • Mixed vegetable stir-fry 350g pack

Instructions

  1. Toss the chicken strips in half of the peanut cooking sauce in a bowl and set aside to marinate for 10 minutes.
  2. Meanwhile, soak 12 medium-length wooden skewers in hot water. Preheat the grill to hot and line a baking tray with foil.
  3. Thread the chicken onto the drained skewers (2–3 strips on each) and lay on the tray. Grill for 8–10 minutes, turning halfway, until lightly charred and cooked through.
  4. Meanwhile, put the remaining peanut cooking sauce in a saucepan with the coconut milk and lime zest. Place over a medium heat and simmer for 5 minutes. Then stir in the lime juice and set aside to cool and thicken slightly.
  5. Divide the uncooked mixed vegetable stir-fry between four bowls and serve alongside the chicken satay skewers and lime wedges. Drizzle some warm peanut sauce over each salad and serve the rest in bowls for dipping the satay in.
  6. Some supermarkets sell a 165ml mini can of coconut milk, which is ideal for this recipe. Otherwise, use part of a can and use the rest with Thai curry paste for another meal.

 

 

Easy Autumn Hanging Basket

I’ve been absolutely thrilled with my petunia-filled baskets this year

but they’re starting to fade now and it’s time to think about getting planters ready for an autumn display.

This little project from our book, Seasonal Garden Ideas, uses a gorgeous selection of heathers, evergreens and stones and should see the baskets looking brilliant until the beginning of winter.

 

Autumn Hanging Basket

Hot Spot Hanging Basket

Here’s an unusual late-season hanging basket, with plants perfectly suited to their position in a real hot spot – in full sun against a dry wall.

Plant in late summer; the arrangement should last until the beginning of winter. Planting up will take about an hour.

Plants

  • Two plants of bell heather (Erica Cinerea).
  • Thyme (Thymus serpyllum variety with variegated leaves).
  • Stonecrop (Sedum spathulifolium ‘Purpureum’).
  • Variegated rock-cress (Arabis ferdinandi-coburgii ‘Variegata’).
  • Dwarf conifer – this is a really tiny spruce (Picea).

Equipment

  • Hanging basket frame, wires and hook.
  • Hanging basket liner (plastic, hessian, felt or moulded paper).
  • Gritty ericaceous (acid) compost.
  • A few stones and/or pebbles.
  • Fine gravel or grit as a topping.

Instructions

  1. Insert a thick layer of liner into the basket – prick small drainage holes through if necessary.
  2. Half-fill the lined basket with very gritty ericaceous compost – good drainage is essential here.
  3. Plant the dwarf conifer first, right at the back of the basket. Set the bell heather plants on either side of the conifer, then firm in all three.
  4. Adjust the level of compost in the basket as needed for the other plants, then plant the thyme on the left and the stonecrop on the right, with the variegated rock-cress in between. Firm in and top up the compost to within 2.5cm (1in) of the rim. Water lightly.
  5. Arrange the stones and/or pebbles between the plants to give the appearance of a  mini-rockery, pushing them into the compost for stability. Finally, spread a 2.5cm (1in) layer of fine gravel or grit on top.
  6. Hang the basket against the wall on a sturdy hook. The gritty compost and stones and pebbles will make the basket heavy, so ensure that it hangs securely.

Tip

Give the thyme a quick squeeze with your fingers as you pass by for a burst of herby, spicy fragrance.

Notes

The dwarf conifer won’t stay ‘dwarf’ for very long. Check its likely height and spread after five years before buying. These have a terrible habit of turning into giants alarmingly quickly. Remove it from the basket before it gets too big and heavy and plant in

the garden.

Aftercare

Water sparingly in dry weather. Clip the heather and thyme in spring to remove straggly growth and to keep the plants neat.

 

Seasonal Garden Ideas £3.99This project is taken from Seasonal Garden Ideas; a beautiful book featuring easy half-day projects, with easy-to-follow instructions, to add beauty to any garden.

Available now at the amazing price of just £3.99!

Competition: Win an Aeropress Coffee Maker

Competition: Win an Aeropress Coffee Maker

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Win a Aeropress Coffee Maker plus a set of Retro Mugs

The AeroPress produces an amazingly smooth, rich coffee with none of the bitterness of drip brewed coffee and none of the bits common with other press type coffee makers.

Enter now at

Facebook https://a.pgtb.me/rZsP0h

Website http://www.dairydiary.co.uk/competitions

or both to double your chance of winning!

Rich Lemon Chicken recipe

Rich Lemon Chicken

  • Servings: 4
  • Time: 55 mins
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Calories 238 per portion
Fat 10g (2.8g sat) per portion

Ingredients

  • Olive or sunflower oil 1 tbsp
  • Chicken thighs 1kg (2¼lb) or 6, skinned, boned, meat cut into chunks
  • Onion 1, peeled and chopped
  • Lemon 1, grated zest and juice
  • Chicken stock 300ml (½ pint)
  • Fresh thyme sprigs 2, or ½ tsp dried
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • Egg yolks 2
  • Parsley or chives small bunch, finely chopped
  • Cooked macaroni or small pasta shapes to serve (optional)Instructions
  1. Heat the oil in a large lidded frying pan over a medium-high heat and add the cubed chicken. Fry for about 5 minutes, stirring occasionally, until lightly browned.
  2. Push the chicken to one side of the pan, then add the onion and fry for 5 minutes until softened.
  3. Add the lemon zest and juice, then the stock, thyme and a little salt and pepper. Bring to the boil, stirring, then reduce the heat, cover and simmer for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  4. Scoop the chicken out of the pan with a slotted spoon and keep warm. Beat the egg yolks together in a bowl, then gradually beat in the hot stock and onions until smooth.
  5. Return the sauce to the pan and cook over a low heat, stirring constantly until it has lightly thickened. Return the chicken to the pan and stir in the chopped herbs. Serve with cooked pasta, if using.

Cook’s tips Be careful not to overheat the sauce at the end when thickening with the egg yolks; if it boils, they will curdle. If you are short of time, you may prefer to use 600g (1lb 5oz) of ready-diced chicken thigh meat, chicken breast mini fillets or turkey breast slices.

A Dairy Cookbook recipe.

#recipes #chicken #greek

Essential Kitchen Gadgets & Equipment

Essential Kitchen Gadgets

I loved watching Mary Berry’s cookery programs on TV recently – she’s my kind of cook – non-egocentric, sensible and precise, yet fun. I learned some great tips from her too.

My favourite tip is so simple I can’t believe I have never used it before. When measuring out tablespoons of something, such as flour, soft cheese or mayo, leave a gap between each in the bowl so if you are interrupted by children/phone/doorbell, you can come back and see instantly how many you have added.

I liked to see what equipment she uses
as well – I have my favourite gadgets at
home but it’s always good to get
recommendations from the experts.

I’ve since read about Delia’s favourite gadgets, and Jamie’s too (though he is far more cavalier than I am in the kitchen). And after all this research (and years of practise) here’s my definitive list:

In the drawer


 

Lemon zesterLemon squeezer & zester

This is the lemon squeezer I used as a child when I baked with my mum. I managed to ‘procure’ it when I left home and I still love it. It fits perfectly on top of a measuring jug and captures the pips while you squeeze. I bought the lemon zester myself and it’s so handy, I often add lemon, lime or orange zest to fish dishes and bakes too.


 

Wooden spoon, box grater, potato
masher & a spaghetti spoon

Enough said!


 

Scissors and knivesKnives & scissors

As with pans, buy the best you can and keep knives sharp with a knife sharpener. I only actually use three. A long serrated knife for bread, a smaller knife for fine chopping and a large sharp knife for bigger veg, such as squash and potatoes. As I mentioned a couple of weeks ago <link to previous blog> I like to ‘chop’ with my kitchen scissors as I find it much easier for herbs, meats and pizza.


 

Vegetable peeler

My personal favourite is an Oxo Good Grips peeler – it works a treat.

In the cupboard


 

PansPans

Buy the best you can afford and they will last a very long time. My favourite pan is a large lidded frying pan also known as the ‘magic pan’ and was bought for me by my mum one Christmas around 10 years’ ago – it’s still going strong. I also have a pan with a steamer on top, which was a wedding present almost 15 years’ ago and has been used almost every day since.


 

Electronic scales

Mine are really cheap – I bought them because I like the pattern and they work!


 

Plastic stuff

Two measuring jugs, a sieve, a colander and a pair of tongs. All cheap and cheerful but they do the job.


 

Electrical stuffElectrical stuff

I like to keep these to a minimum as I don’t like worktop clutter and I have made purchases in the past that just gather dust. I use a hand-held whisk/mixer all the time for bakes and a stick blender for soups and sauces. I do also have a food processor for pastry and other bits and bobs but it’s not used as often.


 

Other stuff

I’m hopeless at finely chopping an onion and so I bought one of these clever little Rotomac gadgets that quickly chop at the pull (or five) of a handle. No power needed, just a quick wash afterwards and, even-better, no drippy eyes.


 

And making use of the Rotomac and lemon zester in this gorgeous recipe from Fantastic Food for Less.

Rich Lemon Chicken

Rich Lemon Chicken

  • Servings: 4
  • Time: 55 mins
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Calories 238 per portion
Fat 10g (2.8g sat) per portion

Ingredients

  • Olive or sunflower oil 1 tbsp
  • Chicken thighs 1kg (2¼lb) or 6, skinned, boned, meat cut into chunks
  • Onion 1, peeled and chopped
  • Lemon 1, grated zest and juice
  • Chicken stock 300ml (½ pint)
  • Fresh thyme sprigs 2, or ½ tsp dried
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • Egg yolks 2
  • Parsley or chives small bunch, finely chopped
  • Cooked macaroni or small pasta shapes to serve (optional)Instructions
  1. Heat the oil in a large lidded frying pan over a medium-high heat and add the cubed chicken. Fry for about 5 minutes, stirring occasionally, until lightly browned.
  2. Push the chicken to one side of the pan, then add the onion and fry for 5 minutes until softened.
  3. Add the lemon zest and juice, then the stock, thyme and a little salt and pepper. Bring to the boil, stirring, then reduce the heat, cover and simmer for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  4. Scoop the chicken out of the pan with a slotted spoon and keep warm. Beat the egg yolks together in a bowl, then gradually beat in the hot stock and onions until smooth.
  5. Return the sauce to the pan and cook over a low heat, stirring constantly until it has lightly thickened. Return the chicken to the pan and stir in the chopped herbs. Serve with cooked pasta, if using.

Cook’s tips Be careful not to overheat the sauce at the end when thickening with the egg yolks; if it boils, they will curdle. If you are short of time, you may prefer to use 600g (1lb 5oz) of ready-diced chicken thigh meat, chicken breast mini fillets or turkey breast slices.

A Dairy Cookbook recipe.

#recipes #chicken #greek

Recipe of the Week: Shrewsbury Biscuits

Shrewsbury Biscuits

  • Servings: makes 24
  • Time: 45 mins
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Calories 102 per portion
Fat 4g (2.9g sat) per portion
Suitable for vegetarians
Suitable for freezing

Originally made in 1760 by a Mr Palin in Shropshire, these biscuits have a light texture and lemony flavour and are very simple to prepare.

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